Latinx Book Club | Announcement + Our First Book Club Pick!

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Hi everyone! If you follow me on Twitter or if you are a part of the bookish community on Twitter, you may have heard about the Latinx Book Club, which I am co-hosting with 5 lovely Latinx bloggers and booktubers. We started this project at the beginning of March and we already have over a 1000 followers on the Twitter account!!! The response has been amazing and I’m so happy to be a part of this project.

But let’s back up a little bit! The Latinx Book Club is – obviously a book club – meant to highlight and boost Latinx authors and Latinx books. Each month, we are voting to choose one book by a Latinx author that we will read together and then discuss it in a twitter chat. The books can be YA or Middle Grade and they can be from any genre. 

The other hosts of the book club are Cande (@Latinx Magic+ @iamrainbou), Jocelyn (@Yogi With a Book + @joceraptor ), Alicia (@A Kernel of Nonsense + @booknonsense), Dani (@ Metamorphoreader + Metamorphodani) and Carolina (@Santana Reads + @Santanareads)

You can find all the info for the book club on the Twitter and Instagram accounts. Also, if you are interested in finding out about Latinx books being release or great Latinx books with amazing rep, you should follow the twitter account!

About a week ago, we put up a poll on Twitter for people to vote and help us choose our April book pick and the results are in! We are so excited to read and talk about this book with everyone that decides to participate!

Without further ado, here is our first book club pick:

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The Storm Runner is a Middle-Grade Fantasy book with a disabled Latinx main character and it’s full of Maya mythology. Also, it’s one of the Rick Riordan Presents books!

Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository |  

Trigger warnings: internalized ableism and use of ableist language

“Zane has always enjoyed exploring the dormant volcano near his home in New Mexico, even though hiking it is challenging. He’d much rather hang out there with his dog, Rosie, than go to middle school, where kids call him Sir Limps a Lot, McGimpster, or Uno — for his one good leg. What Zane doesn’t know is that the volcano is a gateway to another world and he is at the center of a powerful prophecy. 

A new girl at school, Brooks, informs him that he’s destined to release an evil god from the ancient Maya relic he is imprisoned in — unless she can find and remove it first. Together they return to the volcano, where all kinds of crazy happens. Brooks turns into a hawk, a demon attacks them in a cave, and Rosie gives her all while trying to protect Zane. When Zane decides to save his dog no matter the cost, he is thrust into an adventure full of surprising discoveries, dangerous secrets, and an all-out war between the gods, one of whom happens to be his father. To survive, Zane will have to become the Storm Runner. But how can he run when he can’t even walk well without a cane?

Feisty heroes, tricky gods, murderous demons, and spirited giants are just some of the pleasures that await in this fresh and funny take on Maya mythology, as rich and delicious as a mug of authentic hot chocolate.”

Are you joining the Latinx Book Club? Are you excited with out first book club pick? Have you read The Storm Runner before? 

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Blog Tour: Graham’s Delicacies by Em Ali (Review + Playlist)

Review Graphic

Hi everyone! I’m so excited to be a part of the blog tour for an amazing book that I have been highly anticipating. Today, I’m bringing you a review of the book and a playlist  that I did based on it!

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Title: Graham’s Delicacies

Author: Em Ali

Published by: Blue Latte House

Publishing date: March 5th 2019

Genre: Romance

Pages: 227

Saccharine:  Jen goes to work, agonizes over college, and looks forward to the stolen moments in the kitchen. There she can watch Emilie bake love into every morsel. Their delicate friendship takes a step towards a budding romance, but will Jen’s anxiety help them survive their first hurdle?

Delectable: James has never been kissed but he wants to be. Especially by his co-worker Sam, who he can’t talk to without turning into a little jerk. Sam is made of all the good stuff, but will James’ deepest insecurities allow him to kiss the boy?

Ravenous: Alex won’t let some foodie with a video camera bash their beloved bakery, even if it means to be petty. Except they’re nowhere ready for Yujin, the one who got away and is now romancing them. Will Alex’s pride let them see the gold heart the bashful king hides?

Goodreads | Amazon

I received an ARC of this book from the author in exchange of an honest review

Trigger warnings: anxiety, mention of parental death, misgendering (challenged on page), alcohol and sexual content.

Graham’s Delicacies is the fluffy book of my dreams. If you are looking for diverse romance stories with low angst and so much cuteness that you’ll smile most of the time while reading them, Graham’s Delicacies is for you!

There are three queer love stories in this book: Saccharine, Delectable and Ravenous,  and they were all lovely and captivating.

Saccharine is about Jen (she/her), a Black bisexual women with anxiety, and Emilie (they/ their, but she/her for special people), a chubby and anxious nonbinary baker. They are really cute and soft together, but they also have sexy moments. Em’s a really shy character and seeing them be confident and take charge during sex was amazing. Also, I loved Em’s cats, they are named after their favorite Disney princesses! Basically, this story couldn’t get cuter even if it tried.

James and Sam are mentioned a lot in Saccharine, because Jen and Em can tell that they like each other even if they are oblivious to it. By the time the first story was over, I was really excited to finally see how everything played out with James and Sam and I was not disappointed with their story.

Delectable is definitely the story I liked the most in this book, mainly because the dynamic between Sam and James is my favorite. When they are together the atraction and tension is palpable, honestly, I can’t believe how oblivious they were. Also, the flirting in this story is on point, Sam and James have so much chemestry and they are playful but bashful and it’s really entertaining to read. This story shows glimpses of James family and it was amazing, his relationship with his younger siblings is adorable and I would love to read more about his relationship with his twin, Clara, since it’s a bit complicted.

Ravenous is the story of Alex, a nonbinary baker (they/them) and Yujin, a Korean foodie vlogger (he/his). It’s the story with the coolest concept, since the characters have a one night stand and then find each other again after Yujin gives Graham’s a bad review. While I really liked the concept, I had a problem with the way Alex behaves when they meet again, they act like a jerk and, while they apologize later on, what didn’t make sense to me is that Yujin keeps trying even when Alex is behaving that way. Nonetheless, this story redeem itself with some very domestic and adorables scenes between the character and a really sweet ending.

Lastly, I would like to mention that my main issue with this book is that it needs better editing, especially, when it comes to the excesive use of pronouns at some points in the book. There were other little mistakes with phrases and words that didn’t really bother me, but I did have an issue with the fact that sometimes there are so many pronouns in a paragraph that it’s hard to tell who they are refering to and that makes certain scenes confusing.

Overall, I would recommend this to anyone looking for sweet, fluffy stories about POC and queer characters

Rating: 4 stars 

And finally, here’s the playlist I made imspired by this book,  I think the lyrics of the songs go well with the stories. I hope you enjoy it!

Have you read Graham’s Delicacies? Are you planning on reading it? What fluffy books would you recommend? 

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Book Review: Are you Seeing Me? by Darren Groth 

Are You Seeing Me

Title: Are You Seein Me?

Author: Darren Groth

Published by: Orca Book Publishers

Publishing date: March 7th 2017

Genre: Contemporary

Pages: 278

Twins Justine and Perry have left their home in Australia and embarked on the road trip of a lifetime in the Pacific Northwest.

It’s been a year since their dad lost his battle with cancer and Justine became the sole caregiver for her autistic brother, Perry. Now Perry has been accepted into an assisted-living residence in their hometown, Brisbane, Australia, but before he takes up residence, they’re seeking to create the perfect memory. For Perry, the trip is a glorious celebration of some of his favorite things: Ogopogo, Jackie Chan movies, and earthquakes. For Justine, it’s an opportunity to learn how to let go of Perry and of her boyfriend, Marc. Justine also wants to offer their mother the chance to atone for past wrongs.

But the instability that has shaped their lives will not subside, and the seismic event that Perry forewarned threatens to reduce their worlds to rubble…

Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository | Barnes & Nobles | IndieBound 

Are You Seeing Me? is a bittersweet, beautiful and touching story that revolves around the personal journeys of the characters and the relationships between them. I’ll admit that it took me a long time to get into the story, because the writing style wasn’t for me. Groth’s writing felt really choppy, especially at the beginning;he uses really short sentences and that doesn’t allow the story to flow. But at the end, I did manage to get over that and enjoy the book.

This story is about Australian twins. Perry is Autistic and Justine is his main caregiver, this is told in dual perspective, so we get to hear from both Perry and Justine. They are both wonderful and they love each other so much and I just wanted to cry over it. Their love for each other was the best part of the book and seeing them try to protect each other’s happiness was bittersweet at times, because in some situations it meant sacrificing what they wanted or were hoping for.

Justine is an amazing character, she is caring, patient, smart and funny, but she’s scared and stressed all the time because she has so much on her plate. As for Perry, he sometimes makes people feel uncomfortable because of the way he responds to situations, but he’s also articulate, smart and funny. Both of them are very compelling and likeable characters. I think it’s important to mention that the Autistic rep is NOT #ownvoices, but the author has a son that is Autistic and he wrote the book for him and his twin sister. I can’t really speak about how accurate the rep is, but here’s an #ownvoices review of the book.

One thing that I would like to mention is that Perry sometimes makes up movies on his mind and most of the time it’s easy to tell that it what he’s describing isn’t real. Nonetheless, at the end of the book, there’s a long and important part of the story that’s completely told like it’s a movie that Perry is making up in his mind, but at least part of it isn’t, and that makes it odd and a bit confusing. Even if that part didn’t work for me personally, I undertand that it shows how Perry processes the world and how he deals with intense, scary things that feel out of his control.

Now, in terms of other elements that I enjoyed, thorughout the book there are inserts of a diary the twins father kept for Justine since her birth until he passed away, and those parts are captivating and so emotional and it’s a great element of the story that adds depth to it and allows Groth to tell the backstory of their lives in an interesting way. The storyline with the mom is also fantastic, I loved how her relationship with each twin develops, and how even with all the hurt, anger and disappointment that she had caused, we get to see her create new bonds with her children.

Overall, this is a heartwarming and bittersweet story with lovable characters and I would totally recommend it.

Rating: 3,6 stars  

Have you read this series? Are you planning on reading it? What books with autistic rep would you recommend? What books with great siblings relationships would you recommend? 

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9 Books with Autism Representation

9 books with autism representation

9 Books Monday is a feature here on Bookish Wanderess, where I talk about 9 books that have positive representation of diverse experiences including the experiences of people of the LGBTQIA community, Native people, people of color, people with physical and cognitive disabilities or mental illnesses, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities.

In the past, I have done posts about 9 book with: Bisexual female mcLatinx mcBlack mcMuslim mc, Lesbian mcAsian mc, Trans mc, and Anxiety rep. (mc=main characters).

This time I’m doing 9 books with Autism Representation:

3 Books I Read and Loved

The Kiss Quotient

The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang

The autistic rep in this is #ownvoices and it’s insightful and touching. Stella is succeseful and caring, she fixates on routines and obsesses over things and sometimes misses some social cues and she is wonderful and I loved getting to read from her perspective. The love interest is a soft boy which is rare in romance, he is a biracial Vietnamese/Swedish man and the Vietnamese rep is #ownvoices as well. Also, there’s some really steamy scenes in this.

queens of geeks

Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde

This book is really geeky and it has so much diversity.  One of the main characters, Taylor, is on the autism spectrum and has severe anxiety, and the other, Charlie, is a bisexual Chinese-Australian girl. There’s a lovely romantic relationship between Taylor and one of her best friends, and they are just the nerdiest, sweetest pair ever.  I really liked that this didn’t focus only in the hard parts of being Autistic, but also showed the good parts, because I feel that as much as the hard parts needs to be shown, we also need fluffy books about Aspie girls.

Are You Seeing Me

Are You Seeing Me? by Darren Groth 

This story is about Australian twins. Perry is Autistic and Justine is his main caregiver, this is told in dual perspective so we get to hear from both Perry and Justine and they are both wonderful and they just love each other so much and I just wanted to cry over it. The author actually has twins, a son and a daughter just like in the story, and his son is Autistic and he wrote the book for them, which is really sweet. I really liked the fact that this felt pretty realistic the entire time, it was happy and sad at the same time and I think it handled that balance very well. (#ownvoices review)

4 Books on My TBR 

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On The Edge of Gone by Corinne Duyvis 

This book has #ownvoices Autism rep, the main character is biracial black autistic girl and her sister is trans bisexual Black girl. Also, it’s a Sci-Fi/Dystopia book, which I think it’s amazing since I haven’t heard of that many SFF books that have Autistic main characters.

 

Things I Should Have Known

Things I Should Have Known by Claire LaZebnik

This focuses on siblings relationships, which I love, and it’s one of the main reasons I want to read this. There are two sisters, one of them is an Austitic girl and the other is basically her main caretaker, and then there’s two brothers, one of them also has ASD and the other is the main person caring for him. I have heard that this book shows a lot of positive sides of Autism, but it also has a very realistic depiction of ableism that can be hard to handle. (#ownvoices review)

Marcelo in the Real World

 

Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork 

The main character in a Latinx autistic boy and the Latinx rep is #ownvoices. He has gone to a school for disabled kids his whole life and suddenly he has to adjust to working at his dad’s law firm for the summer; I have heard this does a good job showing both the challenges he faces and his strengths in terms of the jobs he’s asked to do. (#ownvoices review)

 

When My Heart Joins the Thousand

When My Heart Joins the Thoysand by A.J. Steiger 

The main character of this story is an Autistic girl and her love interest suffer from a condition called osteogenesis imperfecta, which basically means that his bones break easily, and also he has PTSD caused by familial abuse.  I’m really excited to read this because I have heard that it’s very sex positive and discusses consent and toxic masculinity in relation to sex and I just think that’s amazing and that more YA books need to included those topics! (#ownvoices review)

2 Books Releasing Soon 

The Bride Test

The Bride Test by Helen Hoang 

After loving The Kiss Quotient, I’m can’t wait to read this one! This is about Khai, an Autistic Vietnamese-American man and Esme, a mixed race Vietnamise woman. Esme comes from Vietnam to meet Khai, who is a potential husband and who thinks that he can’t feel big, important emotions and then they meet and a relationship develops between them. Release date: May 7th 2019

 

The Boy Who Steals Houses

The Boy Who Steals Hpuses by C.G. Drews 

This book has #ownvoices Autism rep! Acording to the author there’s a hufflepuff autistic boy in this book and his brother (who’s the main character) is his main caregiver and there’s also anxiety rep and a big loud messy family and a feminist love interest who takes no nonsense and will smite you. So this sounds fantastic and I can’t wait to read it! Release date: April 4th 2019

 

What books with Autism rep have you read and loved? Which ones are on your tbr? Do you know of any fantasy or Sci-Fi books with Autism rep? 

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Diverse Pride and Prejudice Retellings

diverse pride and prejudice retellings

Hi everyone! As someone who loves Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, I’m always looking for retellings and adaptations.  I love to read new takes on this classic story and I love the diverse retellings that have been coming out lately even more. I know Pride and Prejudice is loved by many of you too and I thought it would be a good idea to share some diverse retellings for those of you who enjoy a new twist of this beloved classic!

Without further ado, here are some diverse Pride and Prejudice retellings that I read and loved:

pride Pride by Ibi Zoboi

In this book, the main character Zuri is Haitian-Dominican and the love interest, Darius, is black. I love their dynamic, they are always bantering and bickering, but the main reason this book is amazing is the way it dicusses gentrification and class, including these subjects adds to the original story and makes it more relevant to our time. Also, the representation of a Haitian-Dominican family, in terms of the religion, the food and the family dynamics is so fascinating to read.

 

The Story of Lizzie and Darcy

The Story of Lizzy and Darcy by Grace Watson

The main change in this retelling is (obviously) that Darcy is a woman and she is biracial and bisexual, while Lizzy is a lesbian. Also, instead of Mary Bennet, we get Mark, who is aroace and Colonel Fitwilliam is Will, a trans man. There’s a lot of diversity in this book and it’s well integrated to the story. Lizzie and Darcy have so much chemestry and they both work in publishing industry, which gave this book a cool setting.

 

well-played

Well Played by Katrina Ramos Atienza

This is a Filipino retelling, it takes place in a university and it’s very interesting to get to learn a little bit about how things work in the educational system in the Philippines. The main character in this book, Patrice Reyes, is a passionate soccer player, and Paul Damacio, the love interest, is a math nerd and he’s very similar to Darcy from the book. Actually, this is a pretty faithful retelling, at least when it comes to the main romance.

 

the secret diary of lizzie bennet

The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet by Bernie Su and Kate Rorick 

This book is a companion for the webseries The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, which I LOVE!! You can definitely read this without watching the webseries, but I recommend you watch it since it’s fantastic. This is a pretty close retelling in terms of the main plot points of the story, but it’s set in modern day and Lizzie Bennet is a Youtuber and Darcy runs a media company. Now, the really cool thing is that Bingley is actually Asian and his name is Bing Lee and his sister is, obviously, Caroline Lee. Also, Charlotte is Asian as well!

DIVERSE RETELLINGS I WANT TO READ 

Those were some of the diverse Pride and Prejudice retellings that I have already read, now here are some diverse retellings that I can’t wait to read! Three of them were released recently and one of them is going to be release in 2019.

 

Ayesha at Last by Uzma Jalaluddin 

Two Muslim main characters and an arranged marriage between the wrong people. I think this gonna be a very unique take on the Austen classic and I can’t wait to experience it for myself!

Pride & Prejudice and Passports by Carrie Garrett 

This takes place during the 2016 presidential elections in the United States and the main family, the Benitez, are undocumented immigrants. This retelling seems to give a strong political background to the classic story, which I found fascinating, and I’m excited to have another retelling with Latinx main characters!

Pride, Prejudice and Other Flavors by Sonali Dev (Release date: May 7th 2019) 

For what I have heard, this is a very  loose retelling with a gender flip. In this story, Trisha Raje is a Indian neurosurgeon and Dj Caine is a Indo-African chef, they are from different backgrounds and they don’t like each other at first. I have heard this has interesting discussions about class and cultural difference and I’m excited to give it a chance.

Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal 

The Bennets are the Binats in this retelling set in modern-day Pakistan.  Out of these retelling this seems to be the closest to the original, the Binat family has fallen on hard times, the 5 daughters are unmarried, then Jena meets Bingla at a wedding and everyone is waiting for a proposal. Meanwhile, Alys and Darsee don’t seem to like each other that much.  I have heard great things about this one and I can’t wait to read it!

Have you read Pride and Prejudice? Do you like P&P retellings? Have you read any of the retellings that I mentioned? Are you looking forward to reading any of them? 

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Year of the Asian Sign-Up Post & TBR

year of the asian

Hi everyone! Today I’m sharing with you my sign up post for the Year of Reading Asian Reading Challenge, as well as some of the books I’m planning to read!

The goal of the challenge is to read as many books written by Asian authors as you can in 2019 and is co-hosted by CW @ The Quiet PondLily @ Sprinkles of DreamsShealea @ Shut Up, Shealea, and Vicky @ Vicky Who Reads.

badge_tapir 

I’m aiming to reach the Malayan tapir level, which means I need to read 21 to 30 books. I already read a book this year that counts towards the challenge and it’s The Astonishing Color of After by X.R. Pan (full review).

MY TBR

I decided to focus on books that are already out and that I own already, as a way to reduce my tbr pile. I’m hoping to read most of these books plus some of the 2019 releases with Asian main character and by Asian authors.

Let’s start with the Fantasy and Sci-Fi books I want to read:

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The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang | The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana | Want by Cindy Pon | The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty| Shadow of the Fox by Julie Kagawa| Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao | The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi | Ignite the Stars by Maura Milan 

Now, these are the Contemporary books I’m hoping to get to:

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From Twinkle, With Love by Sandhya Menon | Love, Hate & Other Filters by Samira Ahmed | Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao | Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram | I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo | My So-Called Bollywood Life by Nisha Sharma | P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han

And lastly, an assortment of books from different genres that I want to read:

asian lit

Beginners’s Guide: Love and Other Chemical Reactions by Six de los Reyes | The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo | Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng | China Rich Girlfriend by Kevin Kwan | The Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar

Are you participating in #yarc2019? if so, which level are you aiming for? What books are you excited to read? have you read any of the books I mentioned?

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Diverse Nonfiction Book Recommendations

diverse nonfiction book recommendations

Hi everyone! Today I have a post that’s a bit different for me. I don’t read that much nonfiction, I mainly read YA fantasy and Sci-fi, YA Contemporary, Romance and Mystery. Nonetheless, from time to time, I’ll pick up a nonfiction book and more times than not, I’ll love it. So, I was thinking the other day that maybe some of you also like to read nonfiction from time to time and if that nonfiction is diverse that’s even better and that’s why I decided to share with you some of my favorite diverse nonfiction books.

Without further ado, here they are:

In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom by Yeonmi Park & Maryanne Vollers

In Order to Live by Yeonmi Park

Human rights activist Park, who fled North Korea with her mother in 2007 at age 13 and eventually made it to South Korea two years later after a harrowing ordeal, recognized that in order to be “completely free,” she had to confront the truth of her past. It is an ugly, shameful story of being sold with her mother into slave marriages by Chinese brokers, and although she at first tried to hide the painful details when blending into South Korean society, she realized how her survival story could inspire others. Moreover, her sister had also escaped earlier and had vanished into China for years, prompting the author to go public with her story in the hope of finding her sister. 

Why I recommend it?: I think this is a perfect book for YA readers that want to try nonfiction, especially for readers who like hard hitting contemporaries, because it tells the story of a girl that goes through many heartbreaking things and it focuses on a relatevely small period of time, not like other nonfiction books that tell the story of someone’s entire life. This book is hard to read, because the whole time you know this actually happend to a girl, you know it happens to a lot of girls all over the world. This is heartbreaking, horrific and honest. I’ll admit that the writing isn’t the best and that made it a bit harder to connect to the story, but I still found it an impactful and touching book.

Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More by Janet Mock 

redefining realness

In 2011, Marie Claire magazine published a profile of Janet Mock in which she stepped forward for the first time as a trans woman. Those twenty-three hundred words were life-altering for the People.com editor, turning her into an influential and outspoken public figure and a desperately needed voice for an often voiceless community. In these pages, she offers a bold and inspiring perspective on being young, multicultural, economically challenged, and transgender in America.

Why I recommend it?: This book is incredibly thought-provoking, because Mock doesn’t hold back, she is achingly honest and that makes her story and what she has to say so compelling.  Mock talks about being biracial, trans and poor, she talks about poverty and prostitution, about her priviliges for “passing” as a cis woman, about what’s consider to be the ‘right’ kind of trans women and why that needs to end.  This book is insighful and moving, as well as beautifully written and I feel like everyone should pick it up. (Full review)

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay 

hunger

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her own past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

Why I recommend it?: This book unlike the two that I have already mentioned, it’s made up of essays, so there’s no linear story. There are extremely personal essays, including a incredibly heartbreaking essay about rape (huge trigger warning!), but then there’s also essays about various subjects like how harmful tv shows about losing weight can be. Still, this is mainly a book about Roxane Gay’s relationship with her body, with her weight, with food and it’s personal, raw and honest. This is a very hard book to read, but it is so powerful because it’s talks about her experience as a fat women in a world not built for her in a way that makes you empathize, that makes you see things as common as chairs in a new way because you see them through her eyes.

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

Furiously Happy

In Furiously Happy, a humor memoir tinged with just enough tragedy and pathos to make it worthwhile, Jenny Lawson examines her own experience with severe depression and a host of other conditions, and explains how it has led her to live life to the fullest:

“I’ve often thought that people with severe depression have developed such a well for experiencing extreme emotion that they might be able to experience extreme joy in a way that ‘normal people’ also might never understand. And that’s what Furiously Happy is all about.”

Why I recommend it?: Out of all these books, this is the less heartbreaking and the one that has the most humor, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a very important and touching book. This book focuses on living with a mental illness, on how that looks like in the day to day and on the good and bad that comes with it, and it handles those topics in such a brilliant way. At some points while I was reading, I couldn’t believe someone had the words necessary to explain certain feelings and experiences, that’s how good Jenny Lawson is at translating her experience with depression into words. I would recommend this book to anyone, but particulary, to people that struggle with mental illnesses, I found this to be – as strange as that may seem- a very reassuring book.

Do you have any diverse nonfiction books to recommend? Have you read any of the books I mentioned? is any of them on your tbr? 

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