Diverse Pride and Prejudice Retellings

diverse pride and prejudice retellings

Hi everyone! As someone who loves Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, I’m always looking for retellings and adaptations.  I love to read new takes on this classic story and I love the diverse retellings that have been coming out lately even more. I know Pride and Prejudice is loved by many of you too and I thought it would be a good idea to share some diverse retellings for those of you who enjoy a new twist of this beloved classic!

Without further ado, here are some diverse Pride and Prejudice retellings that I read and loved:

pride Pride by Ibi Zoboi

In this book, the main character Zuri is Haitian-Dominican and the love interest, Darius, is black. I love their dynamic, they are always bantering and bickering, but the main reason this book is amazing is the way it dicusses gentrification and class, including these subjects adds to the original story and makes it more relevant to our time. Also, the representation of a Haitian-Dominican family, in terms of the religion, the food and the family dynamics is so fascinating to read.

 

The Story of Lizzie and Darcy

The Story of Lizzy and Darcy by Grace Watson

The main change in this retelling is (obviously) that Darcy is a woman and she is biracial and bisexual, while Lizzy is a lesbian. Also, instead of Mary Bennet, we get Mark, who is aroace and Colonel Fitwilliam is Will, a trans man. There’s a lot of diversity in this book and it’s well integrated to the story. Lizzie and Darcy have so much chemestry and they both work in publishing industry, which gave this book a cool setting.

 

well-played

Well Played by Katrina Ramos Atienza

This is a Filipino retelling, it takes place in a university and it’s very interesting to get to learn a little bit about how things work in the educational system in the Philippines. The main character in this book, Patrice Reyes, is a passionate soccer player, and Paul Damacio, the love interest, is a math nerd and he’s very similar to Darcy from the book. Actually, this is a pretty faithful retelling, at least when it comes to the main romance.

 

the secret diary of lizzie bennet

The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet by Bernie Su and Kate Rorick 

This book is a companion for the webseries The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, which I LOVE!! You can definitely read this without watching the webseries, but I recommend you watch it since it’s fantastic. This is a pretty close retelling in terms of the main plot points of the story, but it’s set in modern day and Lizzie Bennet is a Youtuber and Darcy runs a media company. Now, the really cool thing is that Bingley is actually Asian and his name is Bing Lee and his sister is, obviously, Caroline Lee. Also, Charlotte is Asian as well!

DIVERSE RETELLINGS I WANT TO READ 

Those were some of the diverse Pride and Prejudice retellings that I have already read, now here are some diverse retellings that I can’t wait to read! Three of them were released recently and one of them is going to be release in 2019.

 

Ayesha at Last by Uzma Jalaluddin 

Two Muslim main characters and an arranged marriage between the wrong people. I think this gonna be a very unique take on the Austen classic and I can’t wait to experience it for myself!

Pride & Prejudice and Passports by Carrie Garrett 

This takes place during the 2016 presidential elections in the United States and the main family, the Benitez, are undocumented immigrants. This retelling seems to give a strong political background to the classic story, which I found fascinating, and I’m excited to have another retelling with Latinx main characters!

Pride, Prejudice and Other Flavors by Sonali Dev (Release date: May 7th 2019) 

For what I have heard, this is a very  loose retelling with a gender flip. In this story, Trisha Raje is a Indian neurosurgeon and Dj Caine is a Indo-African chef, they are from different backgrounds and they don’t like each other at first. I have heard this has interesting discussions about class and cultural difference and I’m excited to give it a chance.

Unmarriageable by Soniah Kamal 

The Bennets are the Binats in this retelling set in modern-day Pakistan.  Out of these retelling this seems to be the closest to the original, the Binat family has fallen on hard times, the 5 daughters are unmarried, then Jena meets Bingla at a wedding and everyone is waiting for a proposal. Meanwhile, Alys and Darsee don’t seem to like each other that much.  I have heard great things about this one and I can’t wait to read it!

Have you read Pride and Prejudice? Do you like P&P retellings? Have you read any of the retellings that I mentioned? Are you looking forward to reading any of them? 

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Anticipated Releases of February 2019

Anticipated Book Releases new

Hi everyone! Today I want to talk about some of the books that are coming out in February 2019 and that I can’t wait to read!

on the come up

On the Come Up by Angie Thomas 

Release Date: February 5th

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least make it out of her neighborhood one day. As the daughter of an underground rap legend who died before he hit big, Bri’s got big shoes to fill. But now that her mom has unexpectedly lost her job, food banks and shutoff notices are as much a part of Bri’s life as beats and rhymes. With bills piling up and homelessness staring her family down, Bri no longer just wants to make it—she has to make it.

Why am I anticipating it?: I obviously read and loved The Hate U Give and I can’t wait to read Angie Thomas second novel. The cover’s amazing and I have heard great things from the few people that got arcs and I’m just excited to get this! Also, it comes out right on time for Black History Month, so I will be reading this as soon as I get it. 

the risk

The Risk by Elle Kennedy (Briar U #2) 

Release Date: February 18th

Everyone says I’m a bad girl. They’re only partly right—I don’t let fear rule me, and I certainly don’t care what people think. But I draw the line at sleeping with the enemy. As the daughter of Briar’s head hockey coach, I’d be vilified if I hooked up with a player from a rival team.

And that’s who Jake Connelly is. Harvard’s star forward is arrogant, annoying, & too attractive for his own good. But fate is cruel—I require his help to secure a coveted internship, and the sexy jerk isn’t making it easy for me. I need Connelly to be my fake boyfriend. For every fake date…he wants a real one.

Which means this bad girl is in big trouble. Nothing good can come from sneaking around with Jake Connelly. My father would kill me, my friends will revolt, and my post-college career is on the line. But while it’s getting harder and harder to resist Jake’s oozing sex appeal and cocky grin, I refuse to fall for him. That’s the one risk I’m not willing to take.

Why am I anticipating it?: This book has fake dating AND enemies to lovers, which are two of my favorite tropes, so I would read it just for that. But the truth is that I have been meaning to read this since I finished the first book in the series, because I loved Brenna when she was introduced in that book and now  she is gonna be the main characters. Also, the glimpses we got of Brenan and Jake in the first book left me really intrigued about their dynamic.

the priory of the orange tree

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon 

Release Date: February 26th

The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction—but assassins are getting closer to her door.

Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic.

Across the dark sea, Tané has trained all her life to be a dragonrider, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel. Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep.

Why am I anticipating it?: Dragons + Matriarchy+ Secret Society of Mages??!  I CAN’T WAIT to get my hand on this book!  Not only does it sound amazing, I actually  have heard great things from people that got arcs.

we set the dark on fire

We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia 

Release Date: February 26th

At the Medio School for Girls, distinguished young women are trained for one of two roles in their polarized society. Depending on her specialization, a graduate will one day run a husband’s household or raise his children, but both are promised a life of comfort and luxury, far from the frequent political uprisings of the lower class. Daniela Vargas is the school’s top student, but her bright future depends upon no one discovering her darkest secret—that her pedigree is a lie. Her parents sacrificed everything to obtain forged identification papers so Dani could rise above her station. Now that her marriage to an important politico’s son is fast approaching, she must keep the truth hidden or be sent back to the fringes of society, where famine and poverty rule supreme.

On her graduation night, Dani seems to be in the clear, despite the surprises that unfold. But nothing prepares her for all the difficult choices she must make, especially when she is asked to spy for a resistance group desperately fighting to bring equality to Medio. Will Dani cling to the privilege her parents fought to win for her, or to give up everything he’s strived for in pursuit of a free Medio—and a chance at a forbidden love?

Why am I anticipating it?: This is close to the top of my list of most anticipated books of 2019, it has a Latinx main characters, the author is also Latinx and there’s an enemies to lovers f/f romance. I mean WHAT ELSE COULD I ASK FOR??! Nothing, really, but still this book gets even better becuase it discusses important subjects like gender roles, immigration and being undocumented. I honestly can’t wait to read it! 

What February book releases are you anticipating? Do you want to read any of the books I mentioned? Have you read any of them already? what did you think about them?

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Year of the Asian Sign-Up Post & TBR

year of the asian

Hi everyone! Today I’m sharing with you my sign up post for the Year of Reading Asian Reading Challenge, as well as some of the books I’m planning to read!

The goal of the challenge is to read as many books written by Asian authors as you can in 2019 and is co-hosted by CW @ The Quiet PondLily @ Sprinkles of DreamsShealea @ Shut Up, Shealea, and Vicky @ Vicky Who Reads.

badge_tapir 

I’m aiming to reach the Malayan tapir level, which means I need to read 21 to 30 books. I already read a book this year that counts towards the challenge and it’s The Astonishing Color of After by X.R. Pan (full review).

MY TBR

I decided to focus on books that are already out and that I own already, as a way to reduce my tbr pile. I’m hoping to read most of these books plus some of the 2019 releases with Asian main character and by Asian authors.

Let’s start with the Fantasy and Sci-Fi books I want to read:

Asian SFF.png

The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang | The Library of Fates by Aditi Khorana | Want by Cindy Pon | The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty| Shadow of the Fox by Julie Kagawa| Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao | The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi | Ignite the Stars by Maura Milan 

Now, these are the Contemporary books I’m hoping to get to:

Asian contemporary.png

From Twinkle, With Love by Sandhya Menon | Love, Hate & Other Filters by Samira Ahmed | Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao | Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram | I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo | My So-Called Bollywood Life by Nisha Sharma | P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han

And lastly, an assortment of books from different genres that I want to read:

asian lit

Beginners’s Guide: Love and Other Chemical Reactions by Six de los Reyes | The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo | Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng | China Rich Girlfriend by Kevin Kwan | The Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar

Are you participating in #yarc2019? if so, which level are you aiming for? What books are you excited to read? have you read any of the books I mentioned?

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Diverse Nonfiction Book Recommendations

diverse nonfiction book recommendations

Hi everyone! Today I have a post that’s a bit different for me. I don’t read that much nonfiction, I mainly read YA fantasy and Sci-fi, YA Contemporary, Romance and Mystery. Nonetheless, from time to time, I’ll pick up a nonfiction book and more times than not, I’ll love it. So, I was thinking the other day that maybe some of you also like to read nonfiction from time to time and if that nonfiction is diverse that’s even better and that’s why I decided to share with you some of my favorite diverse nonfiction books.

Without further ado, here they are:

In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom by Yeonmi Park & Maryanne Vollers

In Order to Live by Yeonmi Park

Human rights activist Park, who fled North Korea with her mother in 2007 at age 13 and eventually made it to South Korea two years later after a harrowing ordeal, recognized that in order to be “completely free,” she had to confront the truth of her past. It is an ugly, shameful story of being sold with her mother into slave marriages by Chinese brokers, and although she at first tried to hide the painful details when blending into South Korean society, she realized how her survival story could inspire others. Moreover, her sister had also escaped earlier and had vanished into China for years, prompting the author to go public with her story in the hope of finding her sister. 

Why I recommend it?: I think this is a perfect book for YA readers that want to try nonfiction, especially for readers who like hard hitting contemporaries, because it tells the story of a girl that goes through many heartbreaking things and it focuses on a relatevely small period of time, not like other nonfiction books that tell the story of someone’s entire life. This book is hard to read, because the whole time you know this actually happend to a girl, you know it happens to a lot of girls all over the world. This is heartbreaking, horrific and honest. I’ll admit that the writing isn’t the best and that made it a bit harder to connect to the story, but I still found it an impactful and touching book.

Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More by Janet Mock 

redefining realness

In 2011, Marie Claire magazine published a profile of Janet Mock in which she stepped forward for the first time as a trans woman. Those twenty-three hundred words were life-altering for the People.com editor, turning her into an influential and outspoken public figure and a desperately needed voice for an often voiceless community. In these pages, she offers a bold and inspiring perspective on being young, multicultural, economically challenged, and transgender in America.

Why I recommend it?: This book is incredibly thought-provoking, because Mock doesn’t hold back, she is achingly honest and that makes her story and what she has to say so compelling.  Mock talks about being biracial, trans and poor, she talks about poverty and prostitution, about her priviliges for “passing” as a cis woman, about what’s consider to be the ‘right’ kind of trans women and why that needs to end.  This book is insighful and moving, as well as beautifully written and I feel like everyone should pick it up. (Full review)

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay 

hunger

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her own past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

Why I recommend it?: This book unlike the two that I have already mentioned, it’s made up of essays, so there’s no linear story. There are extremely personal essays, including a incredibly heartbreaking essay about rape (huge trigger warning!), but then there’s also essays about various subjects like how harmful tv shows about losing weight can be. Still, this is mainly a book about Roxane Gay’s relationship with her body, with her weight, with food and it’s personal, raw and honest. This is a very hard book to read, but it is so powerful because it’s talks about her experience as a fat women in a world not built for her in a way that makes you empathize, that makes you see things as common as chairs in a new way because you see them through her eyes.

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

Furiously Happy

In Furiously Happy, a humor memoir tinged with just enough tragedy and pathos to make it worthwhile, Jenny Lawson examines her own experience with severe depression and a host of other conditions, and explains how it has led her to live life to the fullest:

“I’ve often thought that people with severe depression have developed such a well for experiencing extreme emotion that they might be able to experience extreme joy in a way that ‘normal people’ also might never understand. And that’s what Furiously Happy is all about.”

Why I recommend it?: Out of all these books, this is the less heartbreaking and the one that has the most humor, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a very important and touching book. This book focuses on living with a mental illness, on how that looks like in the day to day and on the good and bad that comes with it, and it handles those topics in such a brilliant way. At some points while I was reading, I couldn’t believe someone had the words necessary to explain certain feelings and experiences, that’s how good Jenny Lawson is at translating her experience with depression into words. I would recommend this book to anyone, but particulary, to people that struggle with mental illnesses, I found this to be – as strange as that may seem- a very reassuring book.

Do you have any diverse nonfiction books to recommend? Have you read any of the books I mentioned? is any of them on your tbr? 

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Mini Review: A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle

Hi everyone! I just wanted to mention before the review that I read this book as part of Catch up on Classics! I have been meaning to read a Sherlock Holmes book for a while and I thought this was the perfect chance.

a study in scarlet

Title: A Study in Scarlet

Author: Arthur Conan Doyle

Publishing date:  1887

Genre: Adult, Mystery

Pages: 143

From the moment Dr John Watson takes lodgings in Baker Street with the consulting detective Sherlock Holmes, he becomes intimately acquainted with the bloody violence and frightening ingenuity of the criminal mind.

In A Study in Scarlet , Holmes and Watson’s first mystery, the pair are summoned to a south London house where they find a dead man whose contorted face is a twisted mask of horror. The body is unmarked by violence but on the wall a mysterious word has been written in blood. The police are baffled by the crime and its circumstances. But when Sherlock Holmes applies his brilliantly logical mind to the problem he uncovers a tragic tale of love and deadly revenge . . .

Goodreads | Amazon

This was my first time reading any of the Sherlock Holmes books and sadly I was disappointed. My main issue with this was that the writing style is so dry and boring, which made this book hard to enjoy.

The beginning of the book was interesting because Watson and Sherlock are introduced and it’s exciting to see the first glimpse of this iconic characters, but that excitement fades away quickly because everything feels slow and boring thanks to the writing style. I was hoping once the story got to the crime solving part things would get better, and while it was a bit more captivating, I felt like I couldn’t even try to solve the mystery behind the murder, because there’s almost no clues, there’s no interrogations, and honestly, there’s barely any information about the crime that was committed.

And then, when it seems like it’s finally time to see Sherlock in action, this book jumps 20 years to the past and starts to talk about Mormons, American pioneers and even the Gold Rush. I’ll admit that this was a bit interesting – even if the writing was still very dry- because I’m not American, so I don’t know a lot of the history that it’s glimpsed in this part of the book.

The ending was ok and things were explained, but what I found weird is that if you have 20 years to plan a crime, you wouldn’t leave so many thing to chance. That didn’t make sense to me and it made me wonder why Sherlock Holmes found the crime so interesting. Anyway, I will give another Sherlok Holmes book a chance, since I think maybe a book with a different case will be more enjoyable for me.

Rating: 3 stars

Have you read any of the Sherlock Holmes books? Which one do you think I should pick up next?

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Book Review: In An Absent Dream by Seanan McGuire

In an Absent Dream

Title: In An Absent Dream

Author: Seanan McGuire

Published by: Tor.com

Publishing date: January 8th 2019

Genre: YA Fantasy

Pages: 187

This is the story of a very serious young girl who would rather study and dream than become a respectable housewife and live up to the expectations of the world around her. As well she should.

When she finds a doorway to a world founded on logic and reason, riddles and lies, she thinks she’s found her paradise. Alas, everything costs at the goblin market, and when her time there is drawing to a close, she makes the kind of bargain that never plays out well.

For anyone . . .

Goodreads| Amazon 

In An Absent Dream has become my favorite book in the Wayward Children series. I found the Goblin Market to be a more fascinating and intricate world than the worlds in other books in the series and I found the whole concept of Fair Value, which is the base of the Market, to be really thought provoking and critical of some of the behaviours and systems we have as a society.

Seanan McGuire takes the writing in this book one step further, it feels even more like a fairytale than the other books and the way in which she tells this cautionary tale is intriguing, because there’s a sort of omnipresent narrator that shows the reader this little glimpses of what’s gonna happen later in the book and that kept me interested and made me want to keep reading until I could found out exactly how thing were gonna play out.

The relationships in this story are very complex and they were of my favorite things about this book.  I loved the friendship between Lundy and Moon and the relationship between Lundy and the Archivist, even if the way those relationships ended kind of dissapointed me. The relationship between Lundy and her father was so interesting and intriguing to me that I wish I got more of it. And lastly, I freaking adored the little bit we saw of the relationship between Lundy and her sister, it was precious.

This book focuses on the moments between adventures, the book mentions that Lundy went questing and defended the Market, but those are not the stories the book is telling. instead, it’s about understanding how the market works and the consequences of not paying fair value. At the beginning, I was a bit disappointed that we were not getting to see Lundy’s adventures, but then I understood that wasn’t neccesary because that wasn’t what the story was about. And also, the events and consequences of those adventures were mentioned enough to answer some of my questions about them while letting the world keep an aura of mystery that was very compelling. I think that’s something Seanan McGuire does very well in all the books in the series, she gives enough information about the world to make it interesting, but there’s things that remain unknown and that way the worlds keep being intriguing.

From the start, you know this book is not gonna have a happy ending, but I didn’t see coming the especific way it ended. I wouldn’t say it was surprising, but I was a bit confused and disappointed in how easily some of the other characters let it happen. I feel like Lundy would have done a lot more to avoid something like that happeneing to the other characters, so I felt a little betrayed in her behalf. But then, I remember that Moon had told Lundy that she would never understanding Fair Value completely, because she wasn’t originally from the Market and I think neither Lundy, as a character, or me, as a reader, completely understood what Fair Value means until the last page of the book. 

Rating: 4,3 stars 

Have you read this book? Are you planning on reading it? Are any fantasy books that you think are similar to this series and that you would recommend?

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Book Review: The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan

The Astonishing Color of After by Emily X.R. Pan

Title: The Astonishing Color of After

Author: Emily X.R. Pan

Published by:Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Publishing date:  March 20th 2018

Genre: YA, Magical-contemporary

Pages: 462

Leigh Chen Sanders is absolutely certain about one thing: When her mother died by suicide, she turned into a bird.

Leigh, who is half Asian and half white, travels to Taiwan to meet her maternal grandparents for the first time. There, she is determined to find her mother, the bird. In her search, she winds up chasing after ghosts, uncovering family secrets, and forging a new relationship with her grandparents. And as she grieves, she must try to reconcile the fact that on the same day she kissed her best friend and longtime secret crush, Axel, her mother was taking her own life.

Alternating between real and magic, past and present, friendship and romance, hope and despair, The Astonishing Color of After is a novel about finding oneself through family history, art, grief, and love.

Goodreads | Amazon 

Trigger Warnings: suicide, depression, suicidal thoughts

Representation: Taiwanese-American main character, Puerto Rican/Filipino love interest,  lots of  Taiwanese characters and a character with depression.

The Astonishing Color of After is a beautifully written bookthe writing style is lyrical and poetic. I’ll admit that I usually have trouble connecting to characters and situations when books have that writing style, but that was not the case with this book, I wasn’t even 10% into it and it had already made me tear up. Later in the book, I did feel the writing distracted me a little from the story, but it was still beautiful.

This is a story about grief and mental illness, especifically depression, and it addresses both of these things in such an amazing and heartbreaking way. This talks about the stigma surrounding depression and how it makes it hard to discuss it with family and friends; it also deals with the feelings and thought process of the loved ones of someone with depression; it portraits how hard depression is and how there’s no easy fix, and it also explores in depth what grief can do to someone. Honestly, this book deals with so many important subjects and it does it so well.

The story is told from Leigh’s point of view, which is interesting, because she is an unreliable narrator and it’s impossible to know which of the things she is seeing and hearing are real. Another reason why Leigh is a compelling narrator is the fact that she is an artist and because of that, she has a particular way of seeing the world, which is really well described and it works well with Emily X.R Pan’s writing.

The development of the relationship between Leigh and her father is one of the most intricate and interesting parts of the story. I wish we had seen more of him in the present and not only in the past, because I feel like at the end so many things between the two of them were resolved in the blink of an eye, with one short conversation between them.

I loved Leigh and Axel together, the evolution of their relationship is told through flashbacks and  I completely fell in love with their dynamic and how sweet Axel is. Also, I really liked the fact that this book didn’t shy away from addressing Leigh’s thoughts and desires about her sexuality. It’s a very sex positive book.

The story did lose me a bit at some point when Leigh was in Taiwan, I hoped that the relationship between her and her grandparents was explored more. There are a few meaningful and sweet moments, but overall, her time in Taiwan felt like it was her going to places and wandering around without getting much out of it. And there was a point where the book started to drag a little. Nonetheless, I did enjoyed the fact that this is set in Taiwan and we get amazing descriptions of food, places, traditions and beliefs. I also want to add that, the way Leigh’s feelings of being out of place with her mother’s family were explored was really interesting, and the way this book portraited- both in flashbacks when Leigh was in the United States and in the present when she was Taiwan- the perception and reactions of other people over her being half-asian and half-white was fascinating.

Lastly, the part of the story that is told through magical memories was great. Those memories are basically where all the big reveals take place and it is a cool and unique way for Leigh to discover the truth about her family and it avoids making the book boring.

Rating: 4 stars

Have you read this book? Are you planning on reading it? What other contemporaries with magical elements would you recommend?

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