Books I wish I could read again for the first time

While I don’t watch booktok content, I still spend a lot of time on tiktok and the other day I saw a video from a bookstore (I didn’t save the video so I don’t know who they are), where booksellers talked about books they wish they could read for the first time, and I haven’t been able to stop thinking about what books would I choose. So today I want to share the books I came up with:

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: this book made me feel so many things so strongly when I read it and I don’t think it would be quite the same on re-read. Also, I think the creepy moments and the horror of the reveals hit harder on the first read.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel: this book has so many different elements (a pandemic, a cult, a theater group, some graphic novels) and different timelines, and the first time I read it it was hard to imagine how they all fit together. I would love to experience again the moment when everything made sense and I saw how every thread was tied together.

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern: when I read this, I felt like I was lost in a strange and beautiful world and I was so intrigued by the mystery of this library, and I would love to have that feeling again and I think it may no be as strong on a re-read

Jade City by Fonda Lee: Something happens in this book that broke my heart and I think that feeling can really only be experienced fully the first time around.Also, the not knowing what’s going to happen next and feeling like no one is safe is not the same once you know what happened.

Kate Daniels Series by Ilona Andrews: this series brought me so much joy, I read all 10 books in about 2 weeks and I fell in love with the characters and the world. I would love to experience again that moment when I realized that I had found something special.

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie: This book is full of suspense, secrets and lies, and I would love to read it again without knowing who is behind everything, if the accusations about the characters are true, and if anyone is going to survive. I remember trying to figure out the mystery being a really fun part of the reading experience because it felt like all the clues were there, I would love to have that again.

Only When It’s Us by Chloe Liese: beyond the fact that this book is excellent, I wish I could read it for the first time because it made me confront the things I assume about people when I meet them and it wouldn’t happen on a re-read because I’d go in knowing that the assumption is wrong.

Headliners by Lucy Parker: this book was a great romance and part of the reason why it’s the humor, I laughed out loud so many times because there were so many funny moments that came unexpectedly and I think they won’t be as funny a second time around, so I would love to be able to experience it for the first time again.

What books do you wish you could read for the first time?

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Top 10 New to Me Authors of 2018

Top 10 new to me authors of 2018

Hi everyone! It’s that time of the year when we make lists of the top bookish things of the year and I really wanted to write about authors I discovered in 2018, wheter they are debuts authors or just authors I had never read before. I chose 10 authors to put on this list and it turns out they were all women, which isn’t that weird because I read mostly female authors.

Without further ado, here’s my top 10:

Somaiya Daud

Somaiya Daud 1.png

  • Book I read: Mirage (Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: I LOVED the way in which Daud wrote the relationship between Maram and Amani, the princess and her body double. Amani is relatable and likable; she is just a girl that is put in a difficult situation and manages to survive. Maram is cruel and arrogant, but as the story unfolds, we see that she is actually a very complex character that is conflicted and feels trapped between what it’s expected of her and who she wants to be. Their relationship is complicated and beautiful and painful and I just LOVE them both so much.

Elizabeth Acevedo

elizabeth acevedo.jpg

  • Book I read: The Poet X (Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: The Poet X was the first book written in verse that I have read and Elizabeth Acevedo’s writing made me feel like I had a direct line to the emotions the main character was experiencing and trying to express. Also, I loved that Acevedo explores so many imporatant subjects like body image, the harm of the male gaze, religion and complicated families in powerful and touching ways.

Libba Bray 

Libba Bray

  • Books I Read: The Diviners & Lair of Dreams
  • Why she made it to the list: The Diviners has become my favorite paranormal series of all times. I think Libba Bray is amazing at writing creepy and atmospheric  books, which has help me discover my love for scary/horror books this year. Also, 1920s New York City is brought to life by her incredible writing and she has created some brilliant characters.

Helen Hoang 

Helen Hoang.jpg

  • Book I Read: The Kiss Quotient
  • Why she made it to the list: The autistic rep in Helen Hoang’s book was so insightful and well done.  Stella is succeseful and caring, she fixates on routines and obsessions and sometimes misses some social cues and she is wonderful and I loved getting to read from her perspective. Also, Helen Hoang wrote a soft male love interest, which is rare in romance, and it was amazing. And she knows how to write some really steamy scenes, so that’s good too!

Holly Black

holly black

  • Book I Read: The Cruel Prince
  • Why she made it to the list: I had been in a fantasy slump for a while and then Holly Black’s book made me feel consumed by a world and characters in a way that hadn’t happened in some time, so I’m really grateful for it. I loved the world she created in The Cruel Prince full of political intrigued, deceitful characters, unexpected turns and so much cruelty from the very beginning. Also, she gave me a new couple to ship, which gave her extra points!

Balli Kaur Jaswal

Billi Kaur Jasmal.jpg

  • Book I Read: Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows
  • Why she made it to the list: I loved the way Balli Kaur Jasmal wrote an amazing friendship between completely different women. The main character, Nikki, was raised in a less traditional way than the group of punjabi widows, she has a completely different way of seeing things. But at the end, these women become friends and they grow and change thanks to their friendship, they learn about themselves and step out of their comfort zone. Also, I think Balli Kaur Jasmal did an amazing job exploring the relationship between gender and religion.

Taylor Jenkins Reid

Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Book I Read: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo
  • Why she made it to the list: Taylor Jenkins Reid created on of the most complex characters I have ever encounter. Evelyn Hugo is a morally gray character that unapologetically does terrible things in order to achive what she wants in life, she sacrifices parts of herself to succeed, but at the same time she loves deeply and she is undeniably loyal to those she loves. I was fascinated by her. Then there the fact that Jenkins Reid wrote a love story, that is so beautiful, sad and complicated, and you can’t help but want the two character to end up together.

Maurene Goo

Maurene Goo

  • Book I Read: The Way You Make Me Feel ( Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: I feel like The Way You Make Me Feel was Maurene Goo’s love letter to L.A. and to food, and she managed to make me want to go to L.A. even more than I already wanted to and also made me very hungry. Her way of writing character development and the development of the father/daughter relationship was fantastic, and the female friendship  was the most wonderful thing ever, Clara and Rose’s friendship shows that real friends help you grow, challenge you to be better, support you and help you see how amazing you are.

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie

  • Books I Read: And Then There Were None, Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, and so many more. (Some reviews here  and here)
  • Why she made it to this list: Agatha Christie’s books are fast and entertaining reads, perfect to get me out of a reading slump. I love the fact that I almost never guess who did it or why, but I can always go back and find the clues to solve the mystery in the book. Most of the books I read by Agatha Christie are Hercules Poirot books, because his whole process to solve a mystery is really interesting to me.

Claire Kann

Claire Kann

  • Book I Read: Let’s Talk about Love (Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: I loved Alice’s, the main character in Let’s Talk about Love, honest and captivating voice, . It was one of the main reasons I loved the book so much. Also, Claire Kann did a great job of addressing acephobia and racial microaggressions, as well as putting therapy in a positive light.
Who are some new to you authors that you loved in 2018? Have you read any of the authors in this list? Did you like their books? 

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Book Review: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

And then there were none

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

Published 1939 

“First, there were ten—a curious assortment of strangers summoned as weekend guests to a private island off the coast of Devon. Their host, an eccentric millionaire unknown to all of them, is nowhere to be found. All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they’re unwilling to reveal—and a secret that will seal their fate. For each has been marked for murder. One by one they fall prey. Before the weekend is out, there will be none. And only the dead are above suspicion.” 

Goodreads | Amazon 

And Then There Were None is a compelling, fun and quick read that keeps readers at the edge of their sit with the supense, secrets and lies. To be honest, the beginning of this book is a bit overwhelming since we are introduced to 10 characters in very short chapters, so it’s difficult to keep track of all of them, but once they get to the island that gets much easier.

One of my favorite aspects of the book is the setting, it takes place in a secluded island, where the 10 characters are trapped since there’s no boat to take them away and there’s no way to communicate with the outside world. The characters don’t know who to trust and they are all paranoid, they are all accused of murder when they get to the island and most of them deny it, but they are all being ‘brough to justice’ regarless and no one knows who is next. That situation sets a compelling mood for the story since the reader doesn’t know the truth about the characters either, so there’s several mysteries at a time, what happened in the past of all these characters and what’s happening in the present while they are in the island.

Another of my favorite things about the book is that there’s a character that very methodically tries to figure out what’s going on and I always like mysteries where the facts are presented orderly to the reader by a character that’s trying to figure out things like alibis, motives, opportunity and that kind of things. Not all characters have the same reaction of trying to understand what’s happening, but that’s something I liked about the book because the reactions of all the characters to the situation are different but very realistic.

From the moment the characters get to the island, there’s suspense and intrigue non stop, which set a really amazing pace to the story and it kept me in the edge of my sit the entire time. The way the secrets of the characters are revealed throughout the story and not just at the beginning, kept my interest really high and kept me confused the whole book. At the end, it’s explained who did it and why, and I liked the fact that even when I didn’t guess, I know I could have guessed because, at the end, the character who set the whole thing up tells you which clues could have helped you figure it out.

Rating: 4,4 stars

Have you read this book? Did you like it? Do you have it on your tbr?

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