9 Books with Fat Representation

Hi everyone! Today, I bring you a new installment of a series that I write here on my blog. 9 Books Monday is a feature where I talk about 9 books that have positive representation of diverse experiences including the experiences of people of the LGBTQIA community, Native people, people of color, people with physical and cognitive disabilities or mental illnesses, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities.

In the past, I have done posts about 9 book with: 

Bisexual female main characters | Latinx main characters | Black main characters | Muslim main characters | Lesbian main characters | Asian main characters | Trans main characters | Anxiety representation | Autism representation | Depression representation

This time I talking about 9 books with Fat Representation:

5 BOOKS I READ AND LOVED

The Summer of Jordi Pérez by Amy Spalding

This book is about Abby, a pink-haired, fat, lesbian girl, who runs a  plus-size style blog. This is a cute story of summer jobs, friendship and first love. An interesting aspect of this book is that, while Abby is confident and comfortable with the way she looks for the most part, she still has her moments of insecurity because she knows how harsh the rest of the world can be. That aspect of the book felt very realistic.

Analee, in Real Life by Janelle Milanes

This is the story of Analee, a fat girl who has self-esteem issues and social anxiety, and who is going through a difficult time dealing with her mother’s death. Throughout the book, Analee learns to appreaciate and love the people she has in her life and she also learns to accept and love herself more. If you like books centered around character development and growth, you will like this one.

Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert

This book is about Chloe, a fat, chronically ill, Black computer geek and this is the story of Chloe being brave, loving herself and falling in love. Chloe’s weight is barely even mentioned, it’s not something she wants to change and it’s never presented as something negative. This book includes important discussions about chronic pain and abusive relationships, but it was also adorable, steamy and fun.

Soft on Soft by Mina Waheed

This book tells the love story between two fat, women of color. One of them is a really anxious makeup artist and the other is a model and actress, who is completely comfortable with the way she looks. This is an adorable and short novella, that doesn’t include homophobia or fatphobia. If you are looking for something low on the angst and high on the fluff, you will enjoy this.

b.b. free by Gabby Rivera

This is an amazing comic about a fat, queer, Latinx girl living in a post-apocalyptic world. While there are no comments about b.b. being fat, it’s amazing just to see a fat girl in a comic being brave and smart and fighting against the beliefs and conventions that other people want to imposse on her.

2 BOOKS ON MY TBR

Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson

This book is about Mila, a fat, Latinx girl, who practices Wicca and who ends up bringing a bunch of murdered teenagers back to life while trying to discover who killed her best friend. While this book has a strange premise, it also portraits some of the real daily microaggressions that fat people have to deal with.

If It Makes You Happy by Claire Kann

This book is about Winnie, a fat, queer, Black girl, who’s trying to win a televised cooking competition to save her grandmother’s dinner. In this book, Winnie doesn’t let anyone make her feel ashamed about her weight, even when people feeling compelled to give her weight loss advice for “her own good”

2 UPCOMING RELEASES

I’ll be the One by Lyla Lee

This book is about Skye, who wants to become a K-Pop star, and to do that, she’s about to break all the rules that society, the media, and even her own mother, have set for fat girls. While Skye is comfortable in her body, the fatphobic beauty standards of the Korean pop entertainment industry still affect her and she has to deal with that. 

Spoiler Alert by Olivia Dade

This book is about April, who posts a plus-size cosplay of a character from a beloved tv show that goes viral and after that she has to deal with trolls and supporters alike. Thanks to the attention, she gets to go on an unexpected date with the star of the tv show, who’s secretly posting fanfiction of his own.

What books with Fat rep have you read and loved? Which ones are on your tbr?

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Top 10 New to Me Authors of 2018

Top 10 new to me authors of 2018

Hi everyone! It’s that time of the year when we make lists of the top bookish things of the year and I really wanted to write about authors I discovered in 2018, wheter they are debuts authors or just authors I had never read before. I chose 10 authors to put on this list and it turns out they were all women, which isn’t that weird because I read mostly female authors.

Without further ado, here’s my top 10:

Somaiya Daud

Somaiya Daud 1.png

  • Book I read: Mirage (Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: I LOVED the way in which Daud wrote the relationship between Maram and Amani, the princess and her body double. Amani is relatable and likable; she is just a girl that is put in a difficult situation and manages to survive. Maram is cruel and arrogant, but as the story unfolds, we see that she is actually a very complex character that is conflicted and feels trapped between what it’s expected of her and who she wants to be. Their relationship is complicated and beautiful and painful and I just LOVE them both so much.

Elizabeth Acevedo

elizabeth acevedo.jpg

  • Book I read: The Poet X (Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: The Poet X was the first book written in verse that I have read and Elizabeth Acevedo’s writing made me feel like I had a direct line to the emotions the main character was experiencing and trying to express. Also, I loved that Acevedo explores so many imporatant subjects like body image, the harm of the male gaze, religion and complicated families in powerful and touching ways.

Libba Bray 

Libba Bray

  • Books I Read: The Diviners & Lair of Dreams
  • Why she made it to the list: The Diviners has become my favorite paranormal series of all times. I think Libba Bray is amazing at writing creepy and atmospheric  books, which has help me discover my love for scary/horror books this year. Also, 1920s New York City is brought to life by her incredible writing and she has created some brilliant characters.

Helen Hoang 

Helen Hoang.jpg

  • Book I Read: The Kiss Quotient
  • Why she made it to the list: The autistic rep in Helen Hoang’s book was so insightful and well done.  Stella is succeseful and caring, she fixates on routines and obsessions and sometimes misses some social cues and she is wonderful and I loved getting to read from her perspective. Also, Helen Hoang wrote a soft male love interest, which is rare in romance, and it was amazing. And she knows how to write some really steamy scenes, so that’s good too!

Holly Black

holly black

  • Book I Read: The Cruel Prince
  • Why she made it to the list: I had been in a fantasy slump for a while and then Holly Black’s book made me feel consumed by a world and characters in a way that hadn’t happened in some time, so I’m really grateful for it. I loved the world she created in The Cruel Prince full of political intrigued, deceitful characters, unexpected turns and so much cruelty from the very beginning. Also, she gave me a new couple to ship, which gave her extra points!

Balli Kaur Jaswal

Billi Kaur Jasmal.jpg

  • Book I Read: Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows
  • Why she made it to the list: I loved the way Balli Kaur Jasmal wrote an amazing friendship between completely different women. The main character, Nikki, was raised in a less traditional way than the group of punjabi widows, she has a completely different way of seeing things. But at the end, these women become friends and they grow and change thanks to their friendship, they learn about themselves and step out of their comfort zone. Also, I think Balli Kaur Jasmal did an amazing job exploring the relationship between gender and religion.

Taylor Jenkins Reid

Taylor Jenkins Reid

  • Book I Read: The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo
  • Why she made it to the list: Taylor Jenkins Reid created on of the most complex characters I have ever encounter. Evelyn Hugo is a morally gray character that unapologetically does terrible things in order to achive what she wants in life, she sacrifices parts of herself to succeed, but at the same time she loves deeply and she is undeniably loyal to those she loves. I was fascinated by her. Then there the fact that Jenkins Reid wrote a love story, that is so beautiful, sad and complicated, and you can’t help but want the two character to end up together.

Maurene Goo

Maurene Goo

  • Book I Read: The Way You Make Me Feel ( Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: I feel like The Way You Make Me Feel was Maurene Goo’s love letter to L.A. and to food, and she managed to make me want to go to L.A. even more than I already wanted to and also made me very hungry. Her way of writing character development and the development of the father/daughter relationship was fantastic, and the female friendship  was the most wonderful thing ever, Clara and Rose’s friendship shows that real friends help you grow, challenge you to be better, support you and help you see how amazing you are.

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie

  • Books I Read: And Then There Were None, Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, and so many more. (Some reviews here  and here)
  • Why she made it to this list: Agatha Christie’s books are fast and entertaining reads, perfect to get me out of a reading slump. I love the fact that I almost never guess who did it or why, but I can always go back and find the clues to solve the mystery in the book. Most of the books I read by Agatha Christie are Hercules Poirot books, because his whole process to solve a mystery is really interesting to me.

Claire Kann

Claire Kann

  • Book I Read: Let’s Talk about Love (Full review)
  • Why she made it to the list: I loved Alice’s, the main character in Let’s Talk about Love, honest and captivating voice, . It was one of the main reasons I loved the book so much. Also, Claire Kann did a great job of addressing acephobia and racial microaggressions, as well as putting therapy in a positive light.
Who are some new to you authors that you loved in 2018? Have you read any of the authors in this list? Did you like their books? 

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Book Review: Let’s Talk About Love by Claire Kann

Let's talk about loveTitle: Let’s Talk About Love

Author: Claire Kann

Published by: Swoon Reads

Publishing date: January 23rd 2018

Genre: Contemporary, YA

Pages: 304

Alice had her whole summer planned. Non-stop all-you-can-eat buffets while marathoning her favorite TV shows (best friends totally included) with the smallest dash of adulting–working at the library to pay her share of the rent. The only thing missing from her perfect plan? Her girlfriend (who ended things when Alice confessed she’s asexual). Alice is done with dating–no thank you, do not pass go, stick a fork in her, done.

But then Alice meets Takumi and she can’t stop thinking about him or the rom com-grade romance feels she did not ask for (uncertainty, butterflies, and swoons, oh my!).

When her blissful summer takes an unexpected turn, and Takumi becomes her knight with a shiny library employee badge (close enough), Alice has to decide if she’s willing to risk their friendship for a love that might not be reciprocated—or understood.

Goodreads | Amazon 

A while ago, I read the first chapter of a few books in an attempt to choose my next read, one of those books was Let’s Talk About Love. Within the first page, I knew I wanted to keep reading it because of the honest and captivating voice of Alice, the main character in this book, who is a biromantic asexual black woman.

From the very first chapter, this book addresses acephobia and confrots a lot of the misconceptions around asexuality. Then as the book progresses, the difference between arousal and attraction is discussed in a way that makes it easy to understand what asexuality means, especially if it’s something new to you. In that sense, this book also does a very good job of portraiting the asolation and loneliness that a lot of ace people go through; as well as the responsability that falls on ace people to educate others because asexuality is not really visible in media or anywhere really.

Other aspect that it’s important to point out, it’s that the representation in this book is #ownvoices in terms of race, the author is a black woman, and it shows in the way racial microaggressions are portraited and discussed in this book, mainly through Alice, but also a little bit through Takumi, the love interest in this book, who is Japanese.

Alice and  Takumi are so cute together and the way their relationship evolves feels so natural. I think this book is so valuable to ace readers, that not only get to see themselves represented, they also get to see an ace woman get a happy ending with a person that loves and respects her.

Also, something else I feel it’s so important about this book is that it puts therapy in a positive light. Lately, more and more books are normalizing therapy but it’s still amazing to see it in a book and I think it’s really valuable.

This book doesn’t have a strong plot, it’s the story of a girl that’s struggling with the opinions and perceptions that other people may have about parts of her identity, mainly her asexuality but also her race. It deals with themes of friendship, love and finding what you want to do in life and how you want to live. It’s told through an honest and captivating voice that will make readers want to invest in her story.

Rating : 4 stars
Have you read this book? Did you like it? Do you have it on your tbr?
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