My favorite books of the first quarter of 2022

Hi everyone! I have seen so many people talking on different platforms about their favorite books so far this year and they made me 1) add a bunch of books to my tbr and 2) want to write a post and talk about my favorite books as well.

So here are the books I have given 5 stars to in the last 3 months, they are books that I read in 2022 but they didn’t necessarily come out this year. I started with my favorite and worked my way down:

Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas: I know this is a very polarizing book but I loved it and it’s the best book I have read this year. I love how atmospheric, unique and intriguing this book is. I was completely captivated while reading it. The fact that the plot is so mysterious and we don’t get all the answers worked perfectly for me and the complex and chaotic characters, as well as the found family element, were some of my favorite things about this. Also, the ending had me at the edge of my seat. (Review)

Payback’s a Witch by Lana Harper: This book has so many elements that I enjoy in stories and I also read it at the perfect time; it was exactly what I needed. I loved the witchy small town, the magic tournament, the humor, the captivating characters, the lovely sapphic romance, the banter between the two main characters, and the personal journey the main character went through. Overall, a fantastic fantasy romance book. (Review)

Comfort Me With Apples by Catherynne M. Valente: This is the kind of story you should go into knowing as little as possible so I won’t say too much, but this book was mindblowing. In such a small amount of pages, it packed so much. This was smart and quietly disturbing and it touches on some powerful themes and commentary revolving around religious ideas and feminist ideas, which is why it can be polarizing, but I found it really thought-proving. (Review)

Finlay Donovan is Killing It by Elle Cosimano: Right after finishing this book, I gave this book 4.5 stars but I bumped it up to 5 because I kept thinking about how much I enjoyed it. This is cozy mystery that’s fun, fast-paced, full of twists and turns, and absolutely absurd. It has a main character who is easy to root for and compelling side characters, as well as a plot that’s ridiculous but also really entertaining. (Review)

Under One Roof by Ali Hazelwood: This was such a fun and quick read, also it helped me get out of my months-long reading slump which makes this special to me. This is a romance novella that has forced proximity and “enemies” who are attracted to each other, slowly become friends, and then become so much more. This book makes the evolution of their relationship so believable and it manages to actually show them becoming more and more important to each other, which was my favorite thing about it. Also, as a bonus, this is really steamy.

What are the best books you have read so far in 2022? Have you read any of my favorite books?

Add me on
 | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads BookstagramBloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Favorite Romance Books of 2021

Hi everyone! While I didn’t have the best reading year in 2021, I did find a few great books. So today I’m excited to share some amazing romance books that I read in 2021 and that I think you should read. I already shared a post with my favorite books of 2021, which includes all of the books that are not romances, so be sure to check out that post!

Without further ado, here are my favorite romance books of 2021:

Battle Royal by Lucy Parker

I LOVED both of the main characters in Battle Royal, this book included the sunshine/grumpy trope in all its glory, they had so much chemistry but also from very early on the deeper connection was evident. In this book, the main characters are co-judges of a baking show and they are competing for the contract to make the royal wedding cake, which ends up being the perfect set-up for a “dislike to friends to love” romance. I love how mature the relationships in Lucy Parker’s books are, even when they are competing against each other like in this book, and how she manages to write books that don’t have too much drama and angst, but that are still interesting.

The writing in this was really good and the book as a whole was funny and entertaining. Obviously, the whole plot with the royals was a bit unbelievable and unrealistic, but it was fun and I didn’t really care if it was something that would never happen in real life.

The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood

Despite all the hype, I was not that excited to read this and I’m not sure why. But I’m really glad I decided to give it a chance because I LOVED it. I usually don’t find that many books funny, but this book actually made me laugh out loud a few times. I really liked both of the main characters, the romance was great, it was a slow burn (in that great way that has you screaming at the character to get together already) and the whole fake dating plotline put them in a bunch of slightly awkward but full of sexual tension situations. Also, it had some good steamy moments.

I also loved that it was set in the academic world, it address obstacles that women faced in academia, and, especially, the storyline about sexual harassment at the end was so frustrating and infuriating, but also so well handled.

To Have and To Hoax by Martha Waters

I read so many mixed reviews of this book, so I didn’t even have it on my tbr. But then I decided to pick it up on a whim and I’m so glad I did. This is the type of second chance romance that works for me, the main characters grew distant from each other because of a misunderstanding but they still love each other, it’s just their pride standing in the way until a prank war breaks loose between them and brings them back together.

I think this book worked so well for me because the pranks weren’t mean or hurtful and they didn’t go too far. The pranks were actually fun and entertaining and this book actually made me laugh out loud a couple of times. I really liked the main characters, their chemistry, and banter. I do think they were a little bit immature but also they grew throughout the book, so I was ok with that.

Twice Shy by Sarah Hogle

This is such a sweet, wonderful slow burn, sunshine/grumpy romance with a good dose of forced proximity, between two strangers that inherited a house and that have to work together to clean it and renovate it. I had a brief moment of thinking I wasn’t going to like the main characters, but it was a false alarm, I ended up loving both of them. And the same happens to them, they have a bad impression of each other at first, but then slowly that changed and it was beautiful to see.

Wesley was so precious, once he got over his shyness and exaggerated grumpiness, he was still grumpy but also kind and sweet. And Maybell is such a genuinely nice, caring character. Wesley and Maybell were wonderful together and once they got together, they approached every situation and misunderstanding with so much compassion and care, which was very refreshing, because there wasn’t some dramatic conflict at any point, they faced obstacles together and got through them. This is not an angsty romance at all, it’s just sweet

Accidentally Engaged by Farah Heron

This book has a really fun premise, because the heroine’s dad rents the apartment next to hers to the hero because he wants her to marry him, and they end up becoming friends and fake dating to enter a baking competition and things get more complicated from there. I loved the romance in this, I liked seeing Reena and Nadim reluctantly become friends and then seeing that friendship evolve into something more. Nadim was really sweet and considerate, which I find so swoony.

Beyond that, this is really a story about Reena and her journey, she feels like a real person and I enjoyed seeing her work to improve different aspects of her life throughout this book. I always enjoy complicated family dynamics, so seeing her deal with and try to improve her relationship with different members of her family added an interesting layer to the book.

Act Your Age, Eve Brown

I have loved all the books in the Brown Sisters Series, so it was not a surprise that I loved this one as well, and the fact that it was a dislike to love romance, which I love, didn’t hurt either. The tension between Eve and Jacob gave me life, their chemistry was so evident and their bickering, especially at the beginning, was so entertaining. And once they get together, the way they both accepted and made space for the needs of the other person was incredibly sweet. Talia Hibbert has a talent for writing healthy relationships, which is something I appreciate a lot. Also, this book has some really steamy scenes, but that’s to be expected from a Talia Hibbert book. Beyond that, I loved reading about Eve and seeing her grow throughout the book and figure out what she wanted from life.

What are your favorite romance books of 2021? If you had to choose one romance book that you read in 2021 for me to read, which one would it be?

Add me on
 Twitter Bookstagram | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

My Favorite Books of 2021

Hi everyone! Today I’m really excited to share my list of favorite books of 2021. These are all books that I think are fantastic and that I hope you read. As I do every year, I will also be posting a list with my favorite romances of 2021, which is why there are no romances on this list. Usually, I also make a favorite YA books list but this year surprisingly I only read 4 YA books, so there won’t be a YA list.

2021 was not the best reading year for me, so it was easy to choose the books that I included on this list because there were not many contenders, which is so sad and something I’m hoping to change in 2022.

Now, for the fun part, here are my favorite books of 2021:

Eartheater by Dolores Reyes

This book has a fascinating concept revolving around a woman who can see how people died, where they are or what happened to them by eating earth connected to the person. It follows this woman as she uncovers the truth of what happened to people that are missing or are found dead, and in that sense, it’s a book about grief, pain, desperation, and it portraits all that in a visceral and honest way, which was very hard to read at times. It’s a masterpiece in my opinion.

This book has a compelling main character that feels like a real, complex, fully rounded person, and her bittersweet journey and relationships are also very captivating. The writing is absolutely beautiful, raw, and perfectly transmits the array of feelings that the main character goes through and that the story tries to capture: anger, frustration, fear, grief, passion, indifference, love.

The Kate Daniels Series by Ilona Andrews

An Introduction to the World of Kate Daniels for New Readers | Den of Geek

I’m cheating a little bit by putting an entire series on this list, but I read all 10 books and 3 of the novellas in the space of 2 weeks, which makes the entire series feel like just one big story instead of individual books. This series is engaging and fun to read and it was exactly what I needed when I read it. It made me remember my love for urban fantasy after years of not reading the genre.

The series has an amazing main character, who is strong, smart, and compassionate but also very flawed, and it also has so many lovable side characters, I was so invested in all of their stories. The characters and the relationships between them are definitely the main reason I loved this story. The main romance was a slow burn, dislike to love romance and it was so good, and there were some incredible secondary ships that I couldn’t help but root for. Also, the world and magic system were unique and interesting, it included mythologies from all over the world, and it was really fast-paced, easy to read, full of action.

The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying a Vampire by Grady Hendrix

This book was so captivating, I was completely invested and it made me feel so many different emotions. I went into this book thinking the villain was the vampire, but the real villain in this story is the husband. I hated him with my entire soul, I was so frustrated and angry at the way he made the main character feel small and unimportant, the way he gaslighted her, made her doubt herself, and try to make her be seen as silly. Honestly, all the husbands in this book were shitty. I think this book did a great job of exploring the roles white women were confined to in the 90s, especially housewives living in the suburbs, and how everyone saw them as unimportant and silly. While at the same time showing the privileges they had and that marginalized communities and, in this case, especially Black women and Black communities didn’t have.

Also, this book has some truly disgusting scenes that made me feel gross-out, there are also infuriating scenes where the main character is gaslighted, there are so many sad and frustrating moments between the core friends that were part of the book club, this book truly made me feel so many things. The ending was bittersweet, realistic, and also satisfying.

Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enriquez

If you told me before this year that a short story collection was going to make it into my list of favorite books of the year, I wouldn’t have believed you. Nonetheless, while there were stories that didn’t completely work for me, the other stories were so incredible that I couldn’t help but love the book.

This collection does a good job of commenting on subjects like poverty, addiction, feminicide, police brutality, and so much more, through a gothic lens and with a touch of paranormal elements (a lot of them related to Argentinian folklore). Most of the stories are disturbing and quietly eerie, some with grotesque moments, some transmitting very well the sense of dread and fear of the characters, and a lot of them with spooky and mysterious circumstances. The author leaves the resolution of a lot of the stories up to the reader’s imagination, so it feels like they end quite abruptly, which is a bit jarring but ends up working really well to maintain the sense of uneasiness that the stories create.

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

It had been a while since I got really interested and invested in a story, but this book managed to suck me in. Even tho, I was so confused at the beginning because it’s that kind of book that throws you in the middle of the story, the world, the characters and doesn’t really hold your hand. But as the story progresses you start to understand more and more, and it becomes a rewarding experience of figuring it all out.

This book has incredible main characters, Gideon is likable, sassy, and entertaining, and Harrow is fierce and focused on getting what she wants, both of them are very damaged by their shared past. I loved the dynamic between them, their banter, and all the angst. It was my favorite part of the book. The side characters are really good too and by the end, I felt like they were very distinctive and I could differentiate them easily. The mystery about this abandoned palace and its previous inhabitants, as well as the whodunnit aspects, are very compelling.

What are your favorite books of 2021? If you had to choose one book that you read in 2021 for me to read, which one would it be?

Add me on
 Twitter Bookstagram | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Favorite Adult Books of 2020

Hi everyone! This is my last post of 2020 and that’s so wild! Blogging was such a refuge for me in 2020 and I fell even more in love with it, so I’m excited to keep sharing content with all of you in 2021.

In case you missed it, the last couple of days I posted my Favorite YA Books of 2020 and my Favorite Romance Books of 2020. Check them out if you want to see what other books I loved this year. Today, I want to talk about 10 adult books that I loved in 2020. These are all books that I read in 2020 even if they didn’t come out in 2020 and the only rule that I had was that I couldn’t have two books from the same series.

Without further ado, here are my top 10 adult books of 2020:

10. The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

The world-building and magic system in this book are unique, captivating and devastating at the same time. The way the society in this book mirrors our society is smart and poignant. There are so many twists, some that I saw coming and some that I didn’t, but they all make sense to the story and make it more interesting. I loved Syenite and Alabaster and I’m heartbroken over everything they went through. What this book has to say and how it says it is so powerful and heartbreaking that it left me feeling hopeless and it took me a long time to recover but I think it was worth it.

9. Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-García

The writing in this book makes it feel like reading a myth or fairytale, it is so engaging. The Mayan mythology is captivating and lush, and since it’s a mythology that it’s not often used in fantasy books, this book is full of gods and mythical creatures that feel unique. This book is set in 1920’s Mexico and the mix of the mythological elements and the ‘modernity’ of the Jazz Age works well and gives this story an even more unique touch. Finally, the main characters, Casiopea and Hun-Kamé, who is the Mayan god of death, are both very engaging characters and their journeys and character development were fascinating.

8. To Be Taught, If Fortunate by Becky Chambers

This is a quick, fascinating, and thought-provoking read. It focuses a lot on the scientific and technical side of space travel but the truly interesting thing is that Becky Chambers doesn’t forget about the impact that the discoveries, the advancements, and the search for those things have on people and environments. Also, there are a lot of queer characters in this book, which I love.

7. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

This book was so powerful. I was captivated the entire time while reading, I was amazed by the way the author takes all of these different elements (a pandemic, a cult, a theater group, some graphic novels) and different timelines and ties them all together in a way it makes sense and it’s interesting and meaningful. I found all the characters and storylines incredibly fascinating. This book made me really sad while reading it, but it also made me feel thankful and, in the end, it gave me hope. 

6. The Dragon Republic by R.F. Kuang

This book is brilliant. I’m not the biggest fan of Military fantasy, but this series does it so well that I’m really invested in the story. The way this book talks about war and power is grim but fascinating. I think the main reason I enjoy this series and this book so much is that it has given me some characters that I adore. I still love Kitay as much as I did in book 1, this book made me fall in love with Venka and I love the angsty, complicated relationship between Rin and Nezha. Also, this book discusses colorism, colonialism, and the role of religion within colonialism in such a thought-provoking way.

5. Jade City by Fonda Lee

This book may have one of the coolest premises ever, it’s like the Godfather with martial arts and magic. It’s such a unique book! Fonda Lee does an amazing job of describing the action scenes in this book and the way she incorporates martial arts is incredible. The clan war element of the story is so interesting, this is a very intense book and I was completely invested in everything that was happening. I think I cared so much because I LOVED the main characters, who are siblings that are incredibly loyal to each other and they won my loyalty too. This book broke my heart at one point, I was devastated but it was SO GOOD.

4. The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

This book is whimsical, nonsensical, and peculiar and the writing is absolutely beautiful. This book doesn’t have a defined plot; it’s full of metaphors and stories within stories, so it can be very confusing and, by the end, I felt like I only understood parts of it; and since it feels like you are reading a story, a myth, a fable, most of the characters feel like characters in that story and not like real people. But I didn’t dislike any of that. While I read this, I felt like I was lost in a strange and beautiful world. I loved and I was invested in all the stories within stories, I was intrigued by the mystery of this underground library, I was captivated by everything.

3. The Strange Case of The Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss

I love the characters in this book, monstrous women are my favorite thing in the world, and I love their relationship with each other and the found family aspect of the book. The premise of this is so unique, the daughters of famous scientists from classic gothic literature work together to solve a mystery that it’s linked to their lives. Also, I love the funny and unique structure in which this book is told, the fact that the characters interrupt the narrative to give their commentary on what’s happening. Basically, I love everything about this.

2. The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune

This is a hopeful and heartwarming book that explores the idea that prejudice keeps growing and wins when people stay silent in the face of it and live comfortably in their bubbles. The concept of this book is fascinating, well-executed and it mirrors a lot of real-life situations, this book is set in a world where magical beings exist and there’s a lot of prejudice against them. The main character in this book is so endearing and the children are cute, funny, lovable and so compelling. The sweet, loving relationship between the main character and the kids is my favorite part of the book. Also, there’s a very sweet m/m romance in this!

1. Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-García

This creepy, atmospheric, and disturbing book. The writing is beautiful and captivating while being simple and unpretentious, and the main character is three-dimensional and flawed, while being charming and bewitching. This story is so effective in being scary because even when it’s not clear if there are ghosts, magic, or other supernatural things going on, the real villains of the story are manipulative, abusive, disgusting men that you could find anywhere in the world and anytime in history. This book is creepy from very early on, Moreno-García made my skin crawl with the simplest scenes, sometimes nothing too scary was happening but with one perfectly crafted phrase, I was spooked. Also, this includes important commentary on sexism, colonialism, and eugenics that gives depth to the story.

What are your favorite Adult books that you read in 2020?

Add me on
Bookstagram | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Favorite YA Books of 2020

Hi everyone! this is the start of my favorite books of the year series, I’m doing favorite YA books, favorite adult books and favorite romance books of 2020. The other two posts are coming in the next couple of days.

The last few years I have been reading less and less YA books, they simply don’t appeal to me as much anymore and in 2020 that trend was even more evident than in previous years. So far in 2020, I have read 196 books and out of those only 31 have been YA. Luckly, even when YA represents a small percentage of my reading, I managed to find some amazing YA books to talk about today. When I read YA is usually by Latinx authors and about Latinx characters, so that’s why all of these books were written by Latinx authors.

Withour further ado, here are my top 5 YA books of 2020 from least favorite to my absolute favorite:

5. Incendiary by Zoraida Cordova

When I read this book at the beginning of 2020, it had been a while since the last time a YA fantasy book gripped me the way Incendiary did. This book has an intricate magic system, intriguing characters, complex relationships, twists and turns that kept me at the edge of my seat, and an ending that left me wanting the sequel immediately. This is a tale of revenge, rebellion, betrayal, and secrets that change everything. (Full review)

4. Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas

This book brought me so much joy and comfort. The main characters are lovable and they have the most adorable and heartwarming romance I read this year. This book manages to be sweet, hopeful, and fun, while still addressing difficult subjects like transphobia, deportation, homelessness, gang violence, and abusive parents. This book does an amazing job of exploring the way transness is viewed and treated in a lot of brown communities, and particularly in the Latinx community; how Trans people are tolerated but not truly accepted. (Full review)

3. Blazewrath Games by Amparo Ortiz

This book is action-packed and entertaining. I love how thorough and interesting the world building in this book is, but what makes this book so captivating and unique is Blazewrath, which is a sport played by teams of dragons and humans, and the Blazewrath games, which are an international sports tournament. The way Amparo Ortiz writes the Blazewrath matches is so incredible, I was at the edge of my seat the entire time while the matches took place, cheering for the Puerto Rican team. (Full review)

2. Lobizona by Romina Garber

This book takes elements that are common in the fantasy genre like an alternate dimension, werewolves, witches, a magical school and a magical sport, and it infuses them with Argentinian folklore and culture, which makes this book unique and captivating. Beyond that, Romina Garber does a great job of addressing important subjects like immigration and the situation that a lot of immigrants face in the United States, as well as sexism and gender essentialism within this magical world and even the Argentinian society. (Full review)

1. Miss Meteor by Anna-Marie McLemore & Tehlor Kay Mejia

McLemore and Mejia delivered a beautifully written, magical story about two characters learning to be true to themselves. This book has adorable friends to lovers romances, heartwarming friendships, wonderfully complicated siblings’ relationships, a powerful message, and amazing character development. I particularly loved how this book addressed heavier subjects like messed up beauty standards, xenophobia, and homophobia in a way that feels very organic. It doesn’t feel like a lesson on those subjects, it’s more about characters living their lives, encountering these things, and having to process and deal with them. (Full review)

What are your favorite YA books that you read in 2020?

Add me on
Bookstagram | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Favorite Books of 2020 So Far

Hi everyone! Today I’m going to talk about the books I have loved the most in 2020 so far. I didn’t include romance because I’m doing a separate post for my favorite romance books of the year since I read so many and since my way of rating and viewing romance vs other genres is so different.

Without fruther ado, here are my top 5 books of 2020 so far + some honorable mentions:

*Click the book titles to go to the Goodreads page*

Jade City by Fonda Lee

  • This book is like the Godfather with martial arts and magic
  • An incredibly cool and unique book. It’s set in a city, where there are technology and magic and there are two powerful clans who are fighting for dominance, there’s also so much political intrigue and the clans are so powerful that the government has to consider them and negotiate with them.
  • The main characters are siblings that are loyal to each other, I loved them so much and they have my loyalty too.
  • A very intense book and I was completely invested in everything that was happening. This broke my heart at one point, I was devastated but it was SO GOOD.
  • Interesting commentary on profit vs cultural significance

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno Garcia

  • A creepy, atmospheric, and disturbing book.
  • The writing is beautiful and captivating while being simple and unpretentious.
  • The haunted house in this story is a secluded, declining, rotting house with no working electricity and strange echos, it’s located in a small abandoned mining town in the middle of nowhere and it has a cementery in the backyard.
  • This book is set in 1950 Mexico and that brings very unique elements to the story.
  • the villains are so effective because even in this setting where it’s not clear if there are ghosts, magic, or other supernatural things going on, the villains are manipulative, abusive, disgusting men that you could find anywhere in the world and anytime in history.
  • Important commentary on sexism, colonialism, and eugenics.

The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune

  • This is a hopeful and heartwarming book
  • It explores the idea that prejudice keeps growing and wins when people, who have the privilege of not being affected by prejudice, stay silent and live comfortably in their bubbles
  • The main character is so endearing
  • A fascinating and well-executed concept. In this world, magical children are sent to orphanages or special schools and the main character’s job is to make sure the children are in safe environments while staying objective and detached. The problem is that the kids are “safe” doesn’t mean that their situation is fair or right.
  • the children are the absolute stars of this book. They are cute, funny, lovable and so compelling.
  • There’s a very sweet m/m romance in this!

The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang

  • This book was really dark and unexpectedly fast-paced
  • Inspired by the Second Sino-Japanese War, it portraits the horrors of war in a very realistic and grim way. This is a grimdark/military fantasy.
  • This is action-packed and there are a lot of brutal, violent scenes
  • it has a power-hungry main character. She starts as ambitious and driven but as she faces discrimination and unfairness and sees the terrible things that are happening, she goes through a huge transformation and becomes very ruthless
  • Once I finished this book I was shocked and I truly didn’t know how to feel.

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno Garcia

  • I have a thing for Moreno-Garcia’s writing if it’s not obvious by the fact that two of her books made it to the list. The writing in this book made it feel like reading a myth or fairytale, it was so engaging.
  • The Mayan mythology was captivating and lush, and since it’s a mythology that it’s not often used in fantasy books, this book was full of gods and mythical creatures that felt very new and unique.
  • This book is set in 1920’s Mexico and the mix of the mythological elements and the ‘modernity’ of the Jazz Age worked well and gave this story an even more unique touch.
  • The main characters, Casiopea and Hun-Kamé, who is the Mayan god of death, are both very engaging characters and their journeys and character development were fascinating.

Honorary Mentions

My favorite YA book

Incendiary by Zoraida Cordova: this book has an intricate magic system, vivid characters, twist and turns that will keep you at the edge of your seat and an ending that will leave you wanting more.

My favorite novellas

To be Taught If Fortunate by Becky Chambers: This was such a quick, fascinating, and thought-provoking read. It focuses a lot on the scientific and technical side of space travel but the truly interesting thing is that Becky Chambers doesn’t forget about the impact that the discoveries, the advancements, and the search for those things have on people and environments. Also, there’s a lot of queer characters in this book, which I loved.

All Systems Red by Martha Wells: a quick and entertaining story. Murderbot, the security bot that is the main character, is likable and engaging and their voice captivated me from the very beginning. This book has great humor and an interesting plot.

What are the best books that you have read in 2020 so far? Have you read any of my favorites?
Add me on

Goodreads Bloglovin Twitter  | Pinterest Letterbox