Books I wish I could read again for the first time

While I don’t watch booktok content, I still spend a lot of time on tiktok and the other day I saw a video from a bookstore (I didn’t save the video so I don’t know who they are), where booksellers talked about books they wish they could read for the first time, and I haven’t been able to stop thinking about what books would I choose. So today I want to share the books I came up with:

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: this book made me feel so many things so strongly when I read it and I don’t think it would be quite the same on re-read. Also, I think the creepy moments and the horror of the reveals hit harder on the first read.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel: this book has so many different elements (a pandemic, a cult, a theater group, some graphic novels) and different timelines, and the first time I read it it was hard to imagine how they all fit together. I would love to experience again the moment when everything made sense and I saw how every thread was tied together.

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern: when I read this, I felt like I was lost in a strange and beautiful world and I was so intrigued by the mystery of this library, and I would love to have that feeling again and I think it may no be as strong on a re-read

Jade City by Fonda Lee: Something happens in this book that broke my heart and I think that feeling can really only be experienced fully the first time around.Also, the not knowing what’s going to happen next and feeling like no one is safe is not the same once you know what happened.

Kate Daniels Series by Ilona Andrews: this series brought me so much joy, I read all 10 books in about 2 weeks and I fell in love with the characters and the world. I would love to experience again that moment when I realized that I had found something special.

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie: This book is full of suspense, secrets and lies, and I would love to read it again without knowing who is behind everything, if the accusations about the characters are true, and if anyone is going to survive. I remember trying to figure out the mystery being a really fun part of the reading experience because it felt like all the clues were there, I would love to have that again.

Only When It’s Us by Chloe Liese: beyond the fact that this book is excellent, I wish I could read it for the first time because it made me confront the things I assume about people when I meet them and it wouldn’t happen on a re-read because I’d go in knowing that the assumption is wrong.

Headliners by Lucy Parker: this book was a great romance and part of the reason why it’s the humor, I laughed out loud so many times because there were so many funny moments that came unexpectedly and I think they won’t be as funny a second time around, so I would love to be able to experience it for the first time again.

What books do you wish you could read for the first time?

Add me on
 | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads BookstagramBloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Upcoming Screen Adaptations of Books by Latinx Authors

Hi everyone! For the last couple years I have seen so many announcements of Latinx books being adapted as movies or series and it makes me so excited! So I decided to put together a list of upcoming screen adaptations of books by Latinx authors. I’m sure I missed some adaptations but I tried to include as many as I could and I ended up with a total of 12 adaptations of Adult, YA and Middle Grade books written by Latinx authors.

Without further ado, here they are:

Fever Dream

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin is the story of a young woman named Amanda, who lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She’s not his mother. He’s not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family. (Goodredas)

The book was adapted as a movie by Netflix, and Samanta Schweblin, the author of the book, co-wrote the script. The movie is coming out on October 13th (it’s almost here!), it was shot in Northern Patagonia (Chile), the director is Peruvian, it had a largely female Chilean crew, mostly Argentine actors and it’s in Spanish.

This book it’s going to translate into a really creepy and unsettling movie, and I can’t wait to watch it. The trailer looks really good and exactly how I pictured everything when I was reading.

Mexican Gothic

Mexic Gothic is the story of a young woman called Noemi, who receives a letter from her cousin begging for someone to save her from her husband. Noemí heads to rescue her not knowing what she will find. Once there, Noemí is mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, and soon she may find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind. (Goodreads)

Mexican Gothic is being adapted as a limited series on Hulu, it’s being produced by Kelly Ripa and Mark Consuelos and Silvia Moreno-Garcia is also an executive producer. According to the author, it will probably have between 8 and 10 episodes. Some more information: here and here

This was my favorite book of 2020, and I think it’s going to make a perfectly suspenseful, weird, and immersive series. I’m really excited to see who gets cast in this and I hope they do the characters justice.

One Hundred Years of Solitude

One Hundred Years of Solitude tells the story of the rise and fall, birth and death of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendiá family. It chronicles the irreconcilable conflict between the desire for solitude and the need for love. (Goodreads)

Netflix is producing a Spanish-language original series based on this novel written by Gabriel García Márquez. The author’s sons Rodrigo and Gonzalo García will serve as executive producers on the series, which will be filmed mainly in Colombia. Some more information: here

Anyone who has even attempted to read this book (like me, because I have never actually finished it) knows that it’s the type of book that it’s SO HARD to adapt, so I’m very nervous about this adaptation but I also have hope it will turn out alright.

Things We Lost in the Fire

Things We Lost In the Fire is a short story collection that brings contemporary Argentina to vibrant life as a place where shocking inequality, violence, and corruption are the law of the land.The short story being adapted depicts the extreme actions of a group of women in response to male violence. (Goodreads)

It was announced in July 2021 that the short story Things We Lost in the Fire will be adapted as a movie. Prano Bailey-Bond has been attached to write and direct and Rodrigo Teixeira (Call Me by Your Name) and Lourenço Sant’Anna (The Lighthouse) will produce. More information: here

The short story that it’s being adapted is so disturbing and thought-provoking and I’m sure it will make a powerful movie.

Her Body and Other Parties

Her Body and Other Parties is a collection of short stories that that map the realities of women’s lives and the violence visited upon their bodies. (Goodreads)

An anthology series based on Her Body and Other Parties is in development at FX. Machado will serve as a producer. The project is headed by writer-producer Gina Welch (Feud, Ray Donovan, The Terror). It’s described as a feminist Black Mirror with fairy tale themes, its hours threaded together with a recurring ensemble of female characters. More information: here and here

I’m not sure how some of this stories are going to be adapted, in particular Especially Heinous, which is inspired by Law & Order, but I’m excited to see how they do it. I think it’s going to be a very weird show and I’m looking forward to watching it.

I am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter is the story of a girl who is dealing with the death of her sister who was their parent’s perfect daughter. Julia is not a perfect Mexican daughter and soon she discovers that her sister might not have been as perfect as everyone thought, so she embarks on a journey to find out the truth about her sister. (Goodreads)

It was announced on February 2021 that I am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter is being adapted into a movie for Netflix, the author (Erika Sanchez) will serve as a co-producer, it will be America Ferrera’s feature directorial debut and Linda Yvette Chávez, the co-creator of Gentefied, adapted the screenplay. Some more information: here

I haven’t read the book and I honestly don’t have any intention to read it, but I will watch the movie since it sounds like a good story, I want to support Latinx adaptations and I really like America Ferrera.

They Both Die at the End

In a world where people get a message the day they are going to die letting them know it’s their last day and where there’s an app called Last Friend where you can find people to spend your last day, two boys with one day left meet for one last great adventure- to live a lifetime in a single day. (Goodreads)

Entertainment One acquired the rights to develop for television and Adam Silvera will write the adaptation. More information: here

This adaptation is going to make me cry, I’m sure of it and I can’t wait.

More Happy Than Not

Aaron is struggling after a family tragedy and his new best friends, Thomas, helps him get through it. As Aaron and Thomas get closer, Aaron discovers things about himself that he wants to forget, and a revolutionary memory-alteration procedure might be the solution. (Goodreads)

HBO Max is developing a one-hour series based on More Happy Than Not and Adam Silvera will serve as executive producers on the project. The series will be developed by Creative Engine Entertainment and eOne (which is also developing Anna K). More information: here

I can’t wait to watch this, I think if they do a good job with the adaptation, it can become a beloved movie just like “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” is, but including Latinx and queer people, and directed at a younger audience.

With Fire on High

With The Fire on High is the story of a teen mom fighting for her dream of becoming a chef while struggling to balance being a mom, going to school, helping support her grandmother, being a friend, and falling in love with a cute boy.  (Goodreads)

In August 2019, it was announced that Picturestart (which is a relatively new company launched by the ex-film boss of Lionsgate) acquired the rights and will develop and produce a film based on this book. The author, Elizabeth Acevedo, will be writing the screenplay to adapt it. More information: here 

I really hope they don’t make this all about the hardships Emoni has to face, I know that part has to be included, but I love the fact that it’s a book about all the ways in which she continues to thrive and grow even when facing difficult decisions

Clap When you land

Clap When You Land is the story of two sisters, one living in the Dominican Republic and the other in New York, that didn’t know the other existed until their father died in a plane crash. Now they have to figure out if they can be sisters and what that will look like. (Goodreads)

In December 2020, it was announced that Made Up Stories acquired the rights to develop Clap When You Land as a television series. Emmy-winning Bruna Papandrea will executive produce and Elizabeth Acevedo will also executive produce and write the pilot. More information: here 

I’m curious about how they are going to integrate the poetry of this book into the story or if they are going to make a regular film. I’m usually not a fan of voice overs but I can’t definitely see them working for this adaptation.

Ghost Squad

Ghost Squad is a Middle-grade novel about two girls who accidentally awaken malicious spirits and have to team up with a grandma and a cat to save their town and the spirits of the dead who are disappearing. (Goodreads)

In February 2020, it was announced that Ghost Squad will be adapted as a live-action hybrid film, which will be directed by Brenda Chapman. Scholastic Entertainment, Josephson Entertainment (Enchanted, Life As We Know It), and Twas Entertainment are developing and producing the project. More information: here 

This is going to be so comforting to watch on screen, it’s such a sweet story and I can’t wait to see who is going to play Babette

Sal and Gabi Break the Universe

Sal and Gabi Break the Universe is a middle-grade story about a boy who can open portals to other universes and who is dealing with the death of his mother, and a smart girl who is trying to discover his secrets. (Goodreads)

It was announced in September 2021 that Sal and Gabi Break the Universe will be adapted as a series for Disney Branded TV. Eva Longoria and Ben Spector will develop and produce the series. More information: here

Sal and Gabi are two of my favorite book characters of all time, so I’m both nervous and excited to see who is going to play them. I have really high hopes for this adaptation and I hope it doesn’t disappoint.

Are you planning on watching any of these adaptations? Which one are you most excited about?

Add me on
Twitter  |   Ko- fi | Goodreads Bookstagram | Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Horror Books by Latinx Authors: recommendations and a tbr

Hi everyone! I have a very exciting post today as part of my celebration of Latinx Heritage Month. I have been trying to get into horror lately and obviously I have tried to pick up horror books by Latinx authors, which is why I wanted to recommend some of them to you. Since it’s almost spooky season, I thought it woulf be a great time for this post. I am also mentioning some books that are on my tbr since I’m so new to this genre.

Since getting interested in horror written by Latinx authors, I have learned that there has been a huge boom of horror books in Latin American countries in the last few years, especially horror books written by women. That’s why most of my recommendactions are translated books and most of the books on my tbr too. Also, simply because I want to read more books set in and written by people living in Latin American countries.

First, here are my recommendations:

Tender is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica

Working at the local processing plant, Marcos is in the business of slaughtering humans —though no one calls them that anymore. Marcos tries not to think too hard about how he makes a living. After all, it happened so quickly. First, it was reported that an infectious virus has made all animal meat poisonous to humans. Then governments initiated the “Transition.” Now, eating human meat—“special meat”—is legal. Then one day Marcos is given a gift: a live specimen of the finest quality. Though he’s aware that any form of personal contact is forbidden on pain of death, little by little he starts to treat her like a human being. And soon, he becomes tortured by what has been lost—and what might still be saved.

This book is actually very disturbing because it makes cannibalism seem like something that could actually happen, the way the author executes the whole concept makes it seem so plausible. Bazterrica does a great job of thinking about all the things we do with animals (eat them, hunt them, use them for skins and to test drugs) and she incorporates all that to the story but changes the animals for humans. She also really goes into a lot of detail about the process of producing human meat from raising to slaughtering to processing to distribution. She explains how everything is done and it’s very unsettling because you can’t help but be repulsed and interested at teh same time.

Another thing that the author does very well is communicating the feeling of desperation, desolation, and loneliness that this society lives in even if they try to pretend they don’t. She creates the perfect atmosphere for the story, which reflects the decline of all the moral values in this society. Beyond the concept, setting, and atmosphere, the plot revolves around events of a smaller scale but it’s as disturbing as everything else

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin

A young woman named Amanda lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She’s not his mother. He’s not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family.

This is a short book that’s very atmospheric, the reading experience is disorienting and trippy since the story is told by a confused, feverish woman, and the author does a great job of transmiting the frustration and fear that the main character feels caused by this very intense and strange little kid who pushes her to talk and won’t answer her questions. Reading this book is a very inmersive experience because all of these elements.

Beyond that, Samanta Schweblin does a good job of commenting on the use of pesticides in Argentina and its effect on entire towns and the people who live in them, but adding a paranormal element that it’s never quite explained but that adds to the weirdness and creepiness of the story.

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-García

After receiving a frantic letter from her newly-wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find. Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer but she is not afraid.

There are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind.

This is a creepy, atmospheric, and disturbing book that has beautiful and captivating writing. The story is so effective in being scary because even when it’s not clear if there are ghosts, magic, or other supernatural things going on, the real villains of the story are manipulative, abusive, disgusting men that you could find anywhere in the world and anytime in history. This book is creepy from very early on, Moreno-García made my skin crawl with the simplest scenes, sometimes nothing too scary was happening but with one perfectly crafted phrase, I was spooked. Also, this includes important commentary on sexism, colonialism, and eugenics that gives depth to the story.

Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enriquez

Short story collection that brings contemporary Argentina to vibrant life as a place where shocking inequality, violence, and corruption are the law of the land, while military dictatorship and legions of desaparecidos loom large in the collective memory.

This book does a good job of commenting on subjects like poverty, addiction, feminicide, police brutality, and so much more, through a gothic lens and with a touch of paranormal elements (a lot of them related to Argentinian folklore). Most of the stories are disturbing and quietly eerie, some with grotesque moments, some transmitting very well the sense of dread and fear of the characters, and most of them revolving spooky and mysterious circumstances. The author leaves the resolution of a lot of the stories up to the reader’s imagination, so it feels like they end quite abruptly, which is a bit jarring but ends up working really well to maintain the sense of uneasiness that the stories create.

Category Five by Ann Dávila Cardinal

After the hurricane, some see destruction and some smell blood. The tiny island of Vieques, located just off the northeastern coast of the main island of Puerto Rico, is trying to recover after hurricane Maria, but the already battered island is now half empty. To make matters worse, developers have come in to buy up the land at a fraction of its worth, taking advantage of the island when it is down. Lupe, Javier, and Marisol are back to investigate a series of murders that follow in the wake of a hurricane and in the shadow of a new supernatural threat.

This is the only YA book on this list, and it’s a quick and entertaining read set in Puerto Rico about teenagers who get involved with a supernatural mystery. This is a ghost story and the really interesting thing about it is that the ghost element is deeply related to the history of Pueblo Rico, and particularly, the history of Pueblo Rico as a colonized land. There are a couple spooky ghost scenes, which was a fun element of the story. Also, the author does a great job of integrating what has happened in Puerto Rico since Hurricane Maria- especially the abandonment of Puerto Rico by the U.S. government – to the book

TBR

I definitely want to explore the horror genre more and specifically, horror written by Latinx authros, so here are some books that have caught my eye and that I’m hoping to read soon:

Hurricane Season by Fernanda Melchor: The story of a small town were the Witch turns up dead. And the discovery of her corpse propels the whole village into an investigation of how and why this murder occurred. Rumors and suspicions spread. As the novel unfolds new details, new acts of depravity or brutality are revealed.

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado: A collection of short stories that that map the realities of women’s lives and the violence visited upon their bodies.

Weep, Woman, Weep by Maria DeBlassie: The story of La Llorona, who roams the waterways looking for the next generation of girls to baptize, filling them with more tears than any woman should have to hold. And there’s not much they can do about the Weeping Woman. Mercy knows this, probably better than anyone. She lost her best friend to La Llorona and almost found a watery grave herself. But she survived. Only she didn’t come back quite right and she knows La Llorona won’t be satisfied until she drags the one soul that got away back to the bottom of the river.”

The Children by Carolina Sanín: The story of a woman who discovers a mysterious young boy on the pavement outside her apartment building: Fidel, who is six years old, a child with seemingly no origins or meaning. With few clues to guide her as she tries to discover his real identity, Laura finds herself swept into a bureaucratic maelstrom of fantastical proportions.

Little Eyes by Samanta Schweblin: The story of little mechanical stuffed animals called Kentukis, which have gone viral across the globe. They have cameras for eyes, wheels for feet, and are connected to an anonymous global server. Owners of kentukis have the eyes of a stranger in their home; or you can be the kentuki and voyeuristically spend time in someone else’s life, controlling the creature with a few keystrokes. These creatures can reveal the beauty of connection between farflung souls – but they also expose the ugly humanity of our increasingly linked world.

Have you read any horror books by Latinx authros? Do you have any recommendations?

Add me on
Twitter  |   Ko- fi | Goodreads Bookstagram | Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

Favorite Adult Books of 2020

Hi everyone! This is my last post of 2020 and that’s so wild! Blogging was such a refuge for me in 2020 and I fell even more in love with it, so I’m excited to keep sharing content with all of you in 2021.

In case you missed it, the last couple of days I posted my Favorite YA Books of 2020 and my Favorite Romance Books of 2020. Check them out if you want to see what other books I loved this year. Today, I want to talk about 10 adult books that I loved in 2020. These are all books that I read in 2020 even if they didn’t come out in 2020 and the only rule that I had was that I couldn’t have two books from the same series.

Without further ado, here are my top 10 adult books of 2020:

10. The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

The world-building and magic system in this book are unique, captivating and devastating at the same time. The way the society in this book mirrors our society is smart and poignant. There are so many twists, some that I saw coming and some that I didn’t, but they all make sense to the story and make it more interesting. I loved Syenite and Alabaster and I’m heartbroken over everything they went through. What this book has to say and how it says it is so powerful and heartbreaking that it left me feeling hopeless and it took me a long time to recover but I think it was worth it.

9. Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-García

The writing in this book makes it feel like reading a myth or fairytale, it is so engaging. The Mayan mythology is captivating and lush, and since it’s a mythology that it’s not often used in fantasy books, this book is full of gods and mythical creatures that feel unique. This book is set in 1920’s Mexico and the mix of the mythological elements and the ‘modernity’ of the Jazz Age works well and gives this story an even more unique touch. Finally, the main characters, Casiopea and Hun-Kamé, who is the Mayan god of death, are both very engaging characters and their journeys and character development were fascinating.

8. To Be Taught, If Fortunate by Becky Chambers

This is a quick, fascinating, and thought-provoking read. It focuses a lot on the scientific and technical side of space travel but the truly interesting thing is that Becky Chambers doesn’t forget about the impact that the discoveries, the advancements, and the search for those things have on people and environments. Also, there are a lot of queer characters in this book, which I love.

7. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

This book was so powerful. I was captivated the entire time while reading, I was amazed by the way the author takes all of these different elements (a pandemic, a cult, a theater group, some graphic novels) and different timelines and ties them all together in a way it makes sense and it’s interesting and meaningful. I found all the characters and storylines incredibly fascinating. This book made me really sad while reading it, but it also made me feel thankful and, in the end, it gave me hope. 

6. The Dragon Republic by R.F. Kuang

This book is brilliant. I’m not the biggest fan of Military fantasy, but this series does it so well that I’m really invested in the story. The way this book talks about war and power is grim but fascinating. I think the main reason I enjoy this series and this book so much is that it has given me some characters that I adore. I still love Kitay as much as I did in book 1, this book made me fall in love with Venka and I love the angsty, complicated relationship between Rin and Nezha. Also, this book discusses colorism, colonialism, and the role of religion within colonialism in such a thought-provoking way.

5. Jade City by Fonda Lee

This book may have one of the coolest premises ever, it’s like the Godfather with martial arts and magic. It’s such a unique book! Fonda Lee does an amazing job of describing the action scenes in this book and the way she incorporates martial arts is incredible. The clan war element of the story is so interesting, this is a very intense book and I was completely invested in everything that was happening. I think I cared so much because I LOVED the main characters, who are siblings that are incredibly loyal to each other and they won my loyalty too. This book broke my heart at one point, I was devastated but it was SO GOOD.

4. The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

This book is whimsical, nonsensical, and peculiar and the writing is absolutely beautiful. This book doesn’t have a defined plot; it’s full of metaphors and stories within stories, so it can be very confusing and, by the end, I felt like I only understood parts of it; and since it feels like you are reading a story, a myth, a fable, most of the characters feel like characters in that story and not like real people. But I didn’t dislike any of that. While I read this, I felt like I was lost in a strange and beautiful world. I loved and I was invested in all the stories within stories, I was intrigued by the mystery of this underground library, I was captivated by everything.

3. The Strange Case of The Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss

I love the characters in this book, monstrous women are my favorite thing in the world, and I love their relationship with each other and the found family aspect of the book. The premise of this is so unique, the daughters of famous scientists from classic gothic literature work together to solve a mystery that it’s linked to their lives. Also, I love the funny and unique structure in which this book is told, the fact that the characters interrupt the narrative to give their commentary on what’s happening. Basically, I love everything about this.

2. The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune

This is a hopeful and heartwarming book that explores the idea that prejudice keeps growing and wins when people stay silent in the face of it and live comfortably in their bubbles. The concept of this book is fascinating, well-executed and it mirrors a lot of real-life situations, this book is set in a world where magical beings exist and there’s a lot of prejudice against them. The main character in this book is so endearing and the children are cute, funny, lovable and so compelling. The sweet, loving relationship between the main character and the kids is my favorite part of the book. Also, there’s a very sweet m/m romance in this!

1. Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-García

This creepy, atmospheric, and disturbing book. The writing is beautiful and captivating while being simple and unpretentious, and the main character is three-dimensional and flawed, while being charming and bewitching. This story is so effective in being scary because even when it’s not clear if there are ghosts, magic, or other supernatural things going on, the real villains of the story are manipulative, abusive, disgusting men that you could find anywhere in the world and anytime in history. This book is creepy from very early on, Moreno-García made my skin crawl with the simplest scenes, sometimes nothing too scary was happening but with one perfectly crafted phrase, I was spooked. Also, this includes important commentary on sexism, colonialism, and eugenics that gives depth to the story.

What are your favorite Adult books that you read in 2020?

Add me on
Bookstagram | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

My Favorite 2020 Releases by Latinx Authors

Hi everyone! Latinx Heritage Month is almost over, which means my posts in celebration of it are also coming to an end. I talk about and highlight books by Latinx authors all year round, but during this month I have talked only about them, and I’m very proud of the content that I have put out. If you want to see the other posts that I have written for Latinx Heritage Month 2020, you can check them out HERE.

Today’s post is about my favorite 2020 releases by Latinx authors. I had 20 books to choose from, so I decided to do this a top 5, and they are ranked, so this list starts with my absolute favorite. It was hard to choose, but I’m happy with my selection!

1. Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-García

I loved everything about this book, the writing captured me from the very beginning, I was so invested in the story, and I connected to the main character. The atmosphere and setting were perfectly creepy, the plot was so intriguing, and it kept me guessing, and the villains are so easy to hate, I had a strong negative reaction towards them. I also enjoyed the way Silvia Moreno-García included important discussions about sexism, colonialism, and eugenics. And the ending was so satisfying. (REVIEW)

2. Miss Meteor by Anna-Marie McLemore and Tehlor Kay Mejia

This book took me by surprise, and I don’t even know why since I loved previous books by both of these authors. This book is so heartwarming, I was invested in the friends to lovers romances, which were adorable, and I loved the siblings’ relationship in this book, the Quintanilla sisters own my heart. To me, this was a very magical story about two characters learning to be true to themselves, and I fell completely in love with it. (REVIEW)

3. Lobizona by Romina Garber

I have been waiting for this story for a long time. Fantasy is my favorite genre, I love reading fantasy books, and I’m so happy to finally have a book that contains so many of the fantasy elements that I love but it’s full of Latinx characters and it’s completely unapologetically about the inclusion of Argentinian culture and the Spanish language. This book delivers Argentinian werewolves and witches, a magical school, a magical sport based on soccer, a traditional Argentinian drink with magical properties and so much more. This story just made my heart so happy. (REVIEW)

4. Blazewrath Games by Amparo Ortiz

Continuing with the trend of books that made me happy, this year we got a book by a Latinx author that includes dragons (!!), and I couldn’t be more excited. This book was fun and entertaining. There’s a sport that involves dragons, which was so cool, I was invested in team Puerto Rico, and I suffered during all their matches. The world-building was incredible, all the lore around the dragons was fascinating, the history of the Blazewrath Games was so expansive, and I’m in awe of the amazing job that Amparo Ortiz did with all that. (REVIEW)

5. You Had Me at Hola by Alexis Daria

As someone who grew up watching telenovelas, this book felt like home and it made me nostalgic. I loved that this included behind the scenes from the show that they were recording, I found all of that so interesting. But my favorite part was obviously the romance in this book, it’s so rare for me to like both of the main characters in a book equally, but Jasmine and Ashton are both amazing and it was so easy to root for them as a couple, they had so much chemistry and a very strong emotional connection.(REVIEW)

Have you read these books and did you enjoy them? What are some of your favorite 2020 releases?
Add me on
Bookstagram | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox

7 Books Set in Latin America

Hi everyone! Today, I have another post to celebrate Latinx Heritage Month!! As I have mentioned before, I’m one of the hosts of the Latinx Book Bingo and this year, one of the prompts of the bingo is to read a book set in Latin America, which inspired me to make a whole post talking about some of my favorite books by Latinx authors that are set in a Latin American country.

If you want to see the other posts that I have written for Latinx Heritage Month 2020, you can check them out HERE.

Without further ado, here are the books:

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼This book follows a young woman and the Mayan god of death as they embark on a quest, where they face all kinds of mythological creatures and deities, in order to save their lives.

🌼It’s set in 1920’s Mexico and the mix of the mythological elements and the ‘modernity’ of the Jazz Age worked well and gave this story an even more unique touch.

🌼The Mayan mythology was captivating and lush, and since it’s a mythology that it’s not often used in fantasy books, this book was full of gods and mythical creatures that felt very new and unique. Plus, the writing style makes it feel like reading a myth or fairytale.

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno- Garcia

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼This book follows Noemí as she goes to a remote town after her cousin writes asking for help because her husband and his family are trying to poison her and, once there, she has to stay in an old, creepy house while she figures out what’s going on.

🌼It’s set in Mexico in the 1950’s and it explores sexism, colonialism, and eugenics since the main character encounters people who believe that they are superior because of their gender, nationality, ethnicity and that they shouldn’t mix with people of “inferior” genetics.

🌼The creepy atmosphere and the suspense make this book unputdownable. It also helps that, the real villains of the story are manipulative, abusive, disgusting men that you could find anywhere in the world and anytime in history and that’s what makes them so easy to hate.

Category Five by Ann Dávila Cardinal

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼Category Five is a quick and entertaining read set in Puerto Rico about teenagers who get involved with a supernatural mystery.

🌼The mystery, which revolves around ghosts, is very intriguing and what makes it more interesting is the fact that it involves the history of Puerto Rico and, because of that there are a lot of discussion about colonization in this book.

🌼The author does a great job of integrating what has happened in Puerto Rico since Hurricane Maria- especially the abandonment of Puerto Rico by the U.S. government – to the book.

Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼This book follows two sisters who didn’t know the other existed until their father dies in a plane crash. Suddenly they have to decide what this new sister means to them and what will it take to keep their dreams alive.

🌼 Part of this book is set in the Dominican Republic where one of the main characters lives and the other part takes place in New York. But for the most part, it is set in the Dominican Republic and it addresses poverty and gender on the Island.

🌼 This is a very emotional book full of complex characters, beautiful writing, and Dominican culture.

Dear Haiti, Love Alaine by Maika & Maritza Moulite

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼This book follows Alaine, who – after a school presentation goes very wrong- finds herself suspended, shipped off to Haiti, working in her aunt’s nonprofit, dealing with complicated family dynamics and writing the report of a lifetime.

🌼 Most of this book is set in Haiti and we get to see the country through the eyes of Alaine, the daughter of Haitian immigrants. The book shows not only the capital, Port-au-Prince, but also some towns and areas close by.

🌼This book is told in diary entries, tweets and emails, which makes it a very quick and unique read. It includes a lot of different storylines revolving around complicated family relationships and dynamics, and there’s a heartbreaking storyline about illness.

Like Water for Chocholate by Laura Esquivel

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼This book follows Tita, who isn’t allowed to marry because she has to look after her mother until she dies. But Tita and Pedro fall in love, so he marries her sister to stay close to her, and Tita and Pedro are forced to circle each other in unconsummated passion. 

🌼 Set in Mexico mostly during different time periods but mainly in the time of the Mexican Revolution.

🌼This book has a unique structure, it integrates magical aspects – especially around food – in a very organic and captivating way, it’s incredibly atmospheric and it includes very complicated and gripping relationships between the characters.

News of a Kidnapping by Gabriel García Márquez

Goodreads | Amazon

🌼This book chronicles the 1990 kidnappings of ten Colombian men and women–all journalists but one–by the Medellín drug boss Pablo Escobar. The carefully orchestrated abductions were Escobar’s attempt to extort from the government its assurance that he, and other narcotics traffickers, would not be extradited to the United States if they were to surrender

🌼 This is a fascinating and gripping account of real events and it’s incredibly well written. Garcia Marquez had access to the testimonies and accounts of a lot of important people in Colombia to write this book and it’s interesting to get to an inside look at what happened during this very well-known moment in Colombia’s history.

Have you read books in Latin America? What’s your favorite book set in LATAM?
Add me on
Bookstagram | Twitter  | Ko- fi | Goodreads Bloglovin Pinterest Letterbox



Ranking all the books I read this month aka My July 2020 Wrap Up

Header

Hi everyone! I hope you all had a lovely July! Today, I want to update you on some cool things that happened in July and I want to talk about all the books I read this month and as always, I’ll rank them from least favorite to favorite. But before getting into the post, I want to encourage you to support the Black Lives Matter movement in any way you can. If you want to know how to help, click this link.

First, some bookish updates:  1) I’m part of the team behind Colored Pages Book Tours, which is a company that prioritizes international and own voices readers when it comes to blog tours. The Company just launched but we have already started organizing tours, so check out the website or twitter to see if you are interested in participating in any of them. 2) I wanted to share that I was invited to be one of the judges of the 2020 Ripped Bodice Awards for Excellence in Romantic Fiction, which I’m incredibly honored and excited about!

That’s it! Those are my updates and now, without further ado, let’s talk about the books I read in July:

*Click on the title of the book to go to the Goodreads page + the amazon links are affiliate links which means I get a small commission if you decide to use them, it doesn’t affect the price of books* 

My Least Favorite Book of the Month

This month there wasn’t one book that I truly disliked, so for my least favorite of the month I chose a disappointing mystery book:

the hollow

13. The Hollow by Agatha Christie: This book was ok, but I definitely expected and wanted to see more of Poirot. He appeared so little in this and it was almost like the focus of this book was not on the case but on the relationships between the characters. The case was interesting enough, but most of the characters in this were very unlikeable at times, which is not uncommon in Agatha Christie’s book and I usually don’t mind, but for some reason, in this one, I found them a bit annoying. (Amazon)

The “I Mostly Liked Them, But…” Books

These are books that I had significant issues with, but they had redeeming qualities that made me mostly enjoy them:

summer knight

12. Summer Knight by Jim Butcher: This ended up being ok, as always with this series it was a quick and entertaining read but I had issues with it. Some of the plot elements in this book felt forced and unrealistic to me, and while I enjoyed getting to see a new element of the world thanks to the fairies and the role they played, I felt like the fairies acted very out of character a lot in this book, they were introduced as one thing but when Harry needed help they suddenly became entirely different characters. Still, I will continue with the series, because as I said the books are quick and entertaining. (Amazon)

The Ones I Liked

The ones I liked are books that I had really small issues with, but after I finished them I had mainly positive feelings towards them:

Go Deep (Unexpected Lovers #1) by Rilzy Adams

11. Go Deep by Rilzy Adams: This started strong, I really enjoyed getting to know the characters, their relationship as best friends and then seeing how fast that relationship changed. I wasn’t the biggest fan of the conflict, it relied too much on the two characters not talking to each other but since it’s a short book the conflict was resolved easily so it wasn’t a big issue. (Amazon)

Amazon.com: I'm Afraid of Men (9780735235939): Vivek Shraya: Books

10. I’m Afraid of Men by Vivek Shraya: This is a short but impactful nonfiction book. The author shares vulnerable and honest insights about gender, sexuality, and toxic masculinity based on their own experience. (Amazon)

Artificial Condition

9. Artificial Condition by Martha Wells: I enjoyed reading this. Murderbot is still an amazing main character and I really liked ART, the sarcastic and slightly rude spaceship that was introduced in this book. The relationship between Murderbot and ART was very entertaining. I really like the humor in this series. My only complaint is that the plot in this one was a lot less interesting than the plot in the first book. (Amazon)

Lock Every Door

8. Lock Every Door by Riley Sager: My reading experience with this book was very weird because it took me a bit to get into this, but after a while, I started to really enjoy it and I actually ended up liking most of the book. Unfortunately, I found the ending a bit disappointing. Riley Sager does a great job of creating tension throughout and I was at the edge of my seat for a big portion of the book and that’s the main reason why I enjoyed this book. (Amazon)

If My Body Could Speak - Button Poetry

7. If My Body Could Speak by Blythe BairdThe writing in this collection was so powerful but so unpretentious at the same time and that made it hit harder. The poems are beautiful and raw. I can’t wait to read more of Blythe Baird’s poetry. (Amazon)

You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

6. You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson: This is a cute, fluffy YA contemporary. I loved Liz as the main character and her journey and character development. The f/f romance is so sweet and heartwarming. (Amazon)

The Ones I Really Liked

I consider books I really liked the ones I really enjoyed, but they are not new all-time favorites:

take-a-hint-dani-brown

Take a Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert:  This book has amazing main characters and there’s a lot of character development. This book is so funny, I laughed out loud more than once. The characters have so much chemistry and the relationship is so adorable, I loved all their interactions, I just wish there were a bit more angst and yearning. Also, it has great anxiety rep! (Amazon)

Assassin's Apprentice (The Farseer Trilogy, Book 1): Amazon.es ...

Assassin’s Apprentice by Robin Hobb: this book does a great job of establishing Fitz as a protagonist and making you feel for him and root for him. I found the world fascinating and the political intrigue aspect of this book was very cleverly done, I’m looking forward to the next books when Fitz is older and maybe he will have a bit more agency and be more involved in what’s going on. (Amazon)

Always Only You (Bergman Brothers, #2) by Chloe Liese

Always Only You by Chloe Liese:  This is a slow-burn, sunshine x grumpy romance where the grumpy one with the heart of gold is the woman and the smiley, sunshiny character is the man. Chloe Liese has a special talent that allows her to create wonderful and complex characters who you can’t help but root for.  The heroine is an Autistic woman (#ownvoices) with a chronic illness (rheumatoid arthritis) and the hero is Ren is an Shakespeare-loving Hockey player. Their relationship is so heartwarming! (Review + Amazon)

My Favorite Book of the Month

My favorite books of the month can have different ratings depending on how good a particular reading month was. This month I read two brilliant books that instantly became new favorites:

The House in the Cerulean Sea

The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune: This book was adorable. The stars of this were definitely the children, they were cute and funny and just lovable. Also, the main character, Linus, was so sweet and his character development in this book was amazing. I love the relationship Linus forms with the kids and how good he is to them. This is such a hopeful book and it made me so happy. Also, there’s a heartwarming m/m romance. (Review + Amazon)

mexican-gothic

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: This book is creepy, atmospheric, and disturbing; and the writing is brilliant, beautiful, and captivating. This book has a very three-dimensional and flawed main character and I absolutely rooted for her the entire time,  and the villains are so well crafted. This book includes a very frustrating but interesting depiction of eugenics and a fascinating exploration of sexism and colonialism. (Review + Amazon)

 What were your favorite and least favorite books you read this month? Have you read any of the books on this wrap up? Do you agree with my opinions about them?

Add me on

Goodreads Bloglovin Twitter  | Pinterest Letterbox

5 Reasons to Read Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Hi everyone! Today I’m going to be talking about one of my most anticipated 2020 releases. After reading and loving Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia earlier this year, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on her next book and I’m so happy to say that I loved Mexican Gothic and I recommend it!

Title: Mexican Gothic

Author: Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Published by: Del Rey

Publishing date:  June 30 2020

Pages: 393 

After receiving a frantic letter from her newly wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find—her cousin’s husband, a handsome Englishman, is a stranger, and Noemí knows little about the region.

Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer: She’s a glamorous debutante, and her chic gowns and perfect red lipstick are more suited for cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing. But she’s also tough and smart, with an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: Not of her cousin’s new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not even of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi’s dreams with visions of blood and doom.

Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family’s youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help Noemí, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family’s past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind.

Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository

trigger warnings: sexual assault, suicide and child brutality.

Without further ado, here are 5 reasons why you should read this book:

1. Brilliant writing: Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s writing manages to be beautiful and captivating while being simple and unpretentious. The writing in this book is not flowery but it conveys and elicits all kinds of emotions.

2. Captivating main character: Noemí, the main character, is three-dimensional and flawed, while being charming and bewitching. She is vain, flighty, smart, beautiful and strong and I couldn’t help but root for her the entire time.

3. The creepiness: This book is creepy from very early on. Moreno-García made my skin crawl with the simplest scenes, sometimes nothing too scary was happening but with one perfectly crafted phrase, I was spooked. The author used the unknown to set an atmosphere of anticipation and suspense that worked really well to keep the creepiness up while allowing the book to become more and more disturbing as it progresses and as more information is revealed not only about what’s going on but also about the true villains of the story.

4. Effective villains: even in the setting of this book where it’s not clear if there are ghosts, magic or other supernatural things going on, the real villains of the story are manipulative, abusive, disgusting men that you could find anywhere in the world and anytime in history and that’s what makes them so effective. They feel like men you have met and, because of that, it’s easy to feel and relate to the main character’s unease, anger, and frustration towards them. 

5. Perfect setting: setting this book in 1950 Mexico was a brilliant decision. First of all, it gives a fascinating historical background to the story, a society that is changing and accepting some modern and liberal (for the time) ideas while trying to hold onto the old social and religious rules. Moreover, High Place, the house where the story takes place, is a secluded, declining, rotting house with no working electricity and strange echos, and it’s located in a small abandoned mining town in the middle of nowhere, where there are people who are clinging to conservative views. All of it makes it a magnificent setting for the creepiness and the sense of claustrophobia of this story. Beyond that, the setting and time period of this book allowed the author to explore sexism, colonialism, and eugenics in very interesting ways since the main character encounters people who believe that they are superior because of their gender, nationality, ethnicity and that they shouldn’t mix with people of “inferior” genetics. 

Overall, Mexican Gothic is a creepy and disturbing gothic horror novel with a unique setting, perfect for anyone who likes a haunted house stories, gothic classics and diverse takes of old horror tropes.

Have you read this book? Did you enjoy it? Do you agree with my opinion?
Add me on

Goodreads Bloglovin Twitter  | Pinterest Letterbox

Anticipated Book Releases of Summer 2020

Hi everyone! Today, I’m going to talk about my most anticipated releases of the summer. I’m kind of in a reading slump right now, so I thought that talking about books that I really want to read and that I’m highly anticipating would help me with that and, at the same time, I could help you find some new books for your tbrs.

Without further ado, here are my most anticipated releases of the summer:

Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Genre: Historical Fiction, Horror

Publication date: July 30th 2020

After receiving a frantic letter from her newly-wed cousin begging for someone to save her, Noemí heads to rescue her from a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find. This story is about an isolated mansion, a chillingly charismatic artistocrat and a brave socialite drawn to expose their treacherous secrets.

Why am I anticipating it? I loved Moreno-Garcia’s Gods of Jade and Shadow, I’m trying to get more into horror and I have heard great things about this one, so I’m excited to give it a chance.

Boyfriend Material by Alexis Hall

Genre: Romance

Publication date: July 7th 2020

Luc and Oliver have 3 things in common: being gay, single, and really, really in need of a date for a big event. So they strike a deal to be publicity-friendly (fake) boyfriends and go then go their separate ways and pretend it never happened. But the thing about fake-dating is that it can feel a lot like real-dating.

Why am I anticipating it? a queer romance book that includes the fake dating trope and it’s set in London… it sounds like a perfect book to me. Also, I jsut got an ARC of it!!!

Engagement & Espionage by Penny Reid

Genre: romance, mystery

Publication date: July 14th 2020

Desperate to find a spare moment together, Jenn and Cletus’s attempts to reconnect are thwarted by one seemingly coincidental disaster after another. It’s not long before Cletus and Jenn see a pattern emerge and the truth becomes clear. Sabotage! Will an undercover mission unmask the culprit? 

Why am I anticipating it? This is the first book in a spin-off of Penny Reid’s Winston Brothers series and it sounds really bizarre, but I love Jenn and Cletus story in Beard Science and I want to read more about them. Also, I’m a fan of cozy mysteries and I want to see Penny Reid’s take on one.

Lobizona by Romina Garber

Genre: YA, Urban Fantasy

Publication date: August 4

As an undocumented immigrant who’s on the run from her father’s Argentine crime-family, Manuela is confined to a small apartment. Until lifelong lies are exposed, her mother is arrested by ICE and Manu starts to discover the truth about her past, which leads her to a secret world buried within our own. A world straight out of Argentine folklore.

Why am I anticipating it? everyone who know me, knows that if there’s a fantasy book with Latinx characters by a Latinx author, I’m gonna read it. I have an ARC of this book and I’ll be reading it in July.

You Had Me at Hola by Alexis Daria

Genre: Romance

Publication date: August 4th 2020

Two soap opera actors get cast together in a bilingual rom-com for the number one streaming service in the country. With their careers on the line, they’ll need to generate smoking-hot on-screen chemistry, so they agree to rehearse in private. But rehearsal leads to kissing, and kissing leads to a behind-the-scenes romance worthy of a soap opera.

Why am I anticipating it? A romance with latinx main characters, who are sopa opera stars…what else do I need? I have read two books by Alexis Daria and really enjoyed both of them, which makes me even more excited for this. Also, look at that cover!

Court of Lions by Somaiya Daud

Genre: YA Sci-fi

Publication date: August 6th 2020

This series is about Amani, who is taken to the royal palace to be the body double of the hated Princess Maram in her public appearances and has to be ready to die in her place. While living in the palace, she becomes entangled with a rebellious group.

Why am I anticipating it? I read and loved an ARC of Mirage, the first book in this series, before the officially release date, so it feels like I have been waiting for this sequel forever. I’m so excited to see where the story goes and what happens to the characters.

Wayward Witch by Zoraida Córdova

Genre: YA Urban Fantasy

Publication date: September 1st 2020

Each book in the series follows one of the Mortiz sisters, who are Latinx brujas. In this book, Rose gets pulled through a portal to the land of Adas, a fairy realm hidden in the Caribbean Sea. While she tries to save Adas, she begins to discover the scope of her powers, the truth about her father’s past, and the sacrifices he made to save her sisters.

Why am I anticipating it? I love the first two books in this series, as well as Zoraida’s latest release Incendiary, so I know I’m gonna love this and I can’t wait to finally find out the truth about the father of the Mortiz sisters.

Kane by Sawyer Bennett

Genre: Romance

Publication date: September 15th 2020

Kane and Mollie have been best friends for a while and after a scary incident, they realize they want to be more than friends. So they start dating and they couldn’t be happier. But then the realities of having careers which keep them on the road put their blossoming relationship on ice.

Why am I anticipating it? I haven’t love the last couple books in this series, but friends to lovers is my favorite trope so I’m definitely reading this. Also, from the little introduction of the two main characters in the previous book, I feel like I’m going to like them.

Each of Us a Desert by Mark Oshiro

Genre: YA Fantasy

Publication date: September 15th 2020

Xochital is destined to wander the desert alone, speaking her troubled village’s stories into its arid winds. Until she meets Emilia and the two set out on a magical journey across the desert, where they find their hearts could be a match… if only they can survive the nightmare-like terrors that arise when the sun goes down.

Why am I anticipating it? A fantasy book with an f/f relationship and Latinx characters written by a Latinx authors is basically everything I have ever wanted. I have an ARC of this book and I’m hoping to read it soon.

Tools of Engagement by Tessa Bailey

Genre: Romance

Publication date: September 22nd 2020

Bethany wants to flip houses as part of her family’s company, but her older brother refuses to take her seriously. When they’re invited on Flip Off, a reality competition, Bethany needs a crew and the only person willing to join her is the new guy in town. Wes and Bethany are forced into close quarters as they remodel the ugliest house on the block.

Why am I anticipating it? I have really liked the first two books in the series and I’m really intrigued by the glimpses of Bethany and Wes in the last book, I feel like they are gonna be one of those couples with great banter and bickering and I’m excited about it!

What book releases from the summer are you anticipating? Do you want to read any of the books I mentioned? 
Add me on

Goodreads Bloglovin Twitter  | Pinterest Letterbox