Latinx Book Bingo 2022 Wrap Up: what i read during Latinx Heritage Month

Latinx Heritage Month has come to an end, so it’s time to share my thoughts on the 10 books I read for Latinx Book Bingo. I was hoping to read 16 books, one for each prompt from the bingo, but unfortunately, I had a work trip to a remote rural area in Colombia for an entire week right in the middle of Latinx Heritage Month and that slowed down my reading. Still, I’m really happy with the books I managed to read.

Witchlings by Claribel Ortega (4.5 stars): My favorite book out of all the ones I read for the book bingo. This was such a sweet book, I don’t really read Middle Grade anymore so I wasn’t expecting to love this as much as I did. The characters in this were so charming, the friendship that developed between the three main characters, who are the most unlikely allies ever, was so sweet, the writing is excellent, the worldbuilding intricate but easy to understand, and I loved the use of Spanish in the magic. 

The Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-García (4 stars): This book is a character-driven, romance-focused story with light fantasy elements and I overall really enjoyed it. It was told from three points of view and there was a bit of a love square that gets very angsty and complicated throughout the book.

I really didn’t like the main character, Nina, for the first half, I thought she was childish and annoying and that affected my enjoyment of the beginning of this book. Nonetheless, I ended up appreciating her character development and how much she grew by the end of the book. Hector was my favorite point-of-view character from the very beginning, even when his motives were not the best at the start of the book, it was still easy to root for him. Also, despite the fact that I didn’t like Nina at first, I enjoyed seeing their relationship from the very beginning and by the end I really wanted them to have a happy ending together. The last pov character was Valeria and she was the worst in the best possible way. She was spiteful, manipulative and mean but I found her to be such an interesting character.

Burn Down, Rise Up by Vincent Tirado (4 stars): Really glad that our group book was this good. This book has the main character, Raquel, that feels like an authentic teenage girl who is trying to make the best decisions she can under the circumstances. It has a really cute sapphic romance and while at the end, the relationship did progress a bit too fast for my taste, I liked seeing how both characters were there for each other. I also really liked the friendship between Raquel and her best friend, Aaron, and how supportive and understanding Aaron was.

I appreciated how many different horror elements this included and how well it incorporated them: a creepy game, a scary alternative dimension, zombies, giant insects, and a mysterious bad guy. I also really liked the connection between those horror elements and the history of the Bronx, gentrification, and racism. This book included some thought-provoking social commentary. I’ll admit that while the connection to historic events was hinted at the beginning, the final reveal of that connection was a bit info-dumpy. Nonetheless, I really enjoyed the way all the elements came together

The Houseguest and Other Stories by Amparo Davila (4.5 stars): The stories in this collection are all disturbing and fascinating. They convey feelings of dread and desperation very well. I’m not usually someone that enjoys vague or open-ended stories, but I really liked the way there are no answers to what was happening in this story once you get to the end, often there was no way of knowing if things were real or not, if the narrators were reliable or not, and that added to the strength of the stories.

Amor, Actually (4 stars): I overall liked this, nonetheless, as with all short story collections, there are some stories that are a lot better than others. I appreciated that there was representation of a lot of different types of couples from m/f to f/f and m/m/f, and also that the levels of steam varied from one story to the next. My favorite stories were by Adriana Herrera, Zoey Castile, and Alexis Daria.

On The Hustle by Adriana Herrera (4 stars): At first, I was having a little of trouble understanding why she liked him even when he was kind of shitty for 3 years. But I saw throughout the book how they fell in love and I thought it was realistic, so I could let go of the issue I had with it. Besides, they had great chemistry, they cared and were there for each other, and there were some very good steamy scenes. As always with Adriana Herrera, the writing was good and the premise was entertaining.

Sun of a Beach by Mia Sosa (3 stars): This had so much potential, but the guy spent the whole novella being an ass and I could understand what made the main character go from disliking him to liking him. Also, the switch in their relationship happened too quickly to be believable and in the end, everything was solved too quickly. Nonetheless, since this was so short, the main character was compelling and there were some good steamy scenes, this didn’t end up being that bad. 

Corazón by Yesika Salgado (4 stars): Like every poetry collection, some poems resonated with me and some didn’t, but overall, the vast majority of them did. This collection addresses body positivity and self-love, family, heartbreak, alcoholism and abusive relationships, and so much more. Yesika Salgado’s poems are powerful, evoking, and unapologetic. The use of Spanish adds a captivating layer to the reading experience.

Tesoro by Yesika Salgado (4 stars): while some poems resonated with me more than others, overall I enjoyed this. This collection focused on family, Yesika Salgado’s upbringing, her heritage, being Latinx, and being a fat brown woman. Just like Corazón, it’s powerful and unapologetic.

What books did you read during Latinx Heritage Month? What books by Latinx authors have you loved recently?

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Latinx Book Bingo 2022 TBR | Latinx Heritage Month 2022

Putting together a tbr for the Latinx Book Bingo is one of my favorite things to do every year and this time it was not an exception. I was trying to pick short books or romances, which I read really fast for this tbr because I want to read one book for each prompt. But adding the page count of all of these books, it’s 4.606 pages in total, which is a bit ambitious because I have a full-time job and a work trip on top of that during the weeks of the readathon. Still, I will try my best.

Are you participating in the Latinx Book Bingo? Have you picked the books for your tbr?

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80 Book Recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo | Latinx Heritage Month 2022

My favorite time of the year aka Latinx Heritage Month is almost here, which means the Latinx Book Bingo is coming and it’s time to share some recommendations for all of the people participating and also in general for everyone looking for books by Latinx authors. Just like last year, this year I decided to only include books I have already read in this recommendations post, the only exceptions are the group book and the two recommendations for the prompt “disabled mc” because while I have read a few books with a disabled mc, unfortunately, the representation in them has not been great.

I will link my recommendation posts for previous years, which in most cases included books that I have not read, in case anyone needs more options:

For each one of my recommendations, I’m including the genre, age group (Middle-grade, YA, or adult) and if it fits other prompts besides the one I’m recommending it for. Without further ado, here are my recs:

Set in LATAM

TRANSLATED

CO-AUTHORED


ROMANCE

POETRY OR NOVEL IN VERSE

FOODIE

INDIE

NONFICTION

AFRO-LATINX AUTHOR

GROUP BOOK

Burn Down, Rise Up by Vincent Tirado: YA book. Other prompts: Afro-Latinx author and horror.

HORROR

BANNED

MIDDLE GRADE

JOYFUL

PART OF A SERIES

DISABLED MC

Are you participating in the Latinx Book Bingo? Have you picked the books for your tbr?

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Latinx Book Bingo 2022: Readathon Announcement

Today I’m bringing really exciting news! Latinx heritage month is almost here and I’m really happy to share with you that the Latinx Book Bingo is officially coming back for round five! This year the readathon is going to be hosted by Paola, Cande and me.

THE BINGO

The Latinx book bingo will take place from September 15 to October 15, which is when we celebrate Latinx Heritage Month. The goal of the readathon is to highlight books written by Latinx authors.

The aim of the bingo is to read as many Latinx books as you can, guided by the prompts on the bingo board.  You can also try to get a bingo (read all prompts on a single line or row — you can read horizontally, vertically, and diagonally), but it’s not necessary, we just hope you read some Latinx reads during this month.

GROUP BOOK

This year we are super excited to have a group book, which is Burn Down, Rise Up by Vincent Tirado, a YA Horror book written by a nonbinary, Afro-Latine author. This book is described as Stranger Things meets Get Out and it’s Sapphic.

Synopsis:

For over a year, the Bronx has been plagued by sudden disappearances that no one can explain. Sixteen-year-old Raquel does her best to ignore it. After all, the police only look for the white kids. But when her crush Charlize’s cousin goes missing, Raquel starts to pay attention—especially when her own mom comes down with a mysterious illness that seems linked to the disappearances.

Raquel and Charlize team up to investigate, but they soon discover that everything is tied to a terrifying urban legend called the Echo Game. The game is rumored to trap people in a sinister world underneath the city, and the rules are based on a particularly dark chapter in New York’s past. And if the friends want to save their home and everyone they love, they will have to play the game and destroy the evil at its heart—or die trying.

OTHER INFO

If you want up-to-date information, or to participate challenges and reading sprints, follow  @LatinxBookBingo  on Twitter or @LatinxBookBingo on Instagram. You can use the #LatinxBookBingo hashtag for all your related tweets and posts and we will be retweeting and sharing on our platforms.

  • We will also do a liveshow on October 16 at 8 pm EST where we will talk about the group book. It will be on Paola’s channel.
  • There will be weekly Instagram challenges, which will be announced on our Instagram account (@LatinxBookBingo)
  • There will be reading sprints every Tuesday during the readathon on Paola’s channel:

I hope you can join us! If you have any questions, please let them in the comments! 

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Latinx Book Bingo Wrap Up | Latinx Heritage Month 2021

Hi everyone! The fourth round of the Latinx Book Bingo has come to an end, I had so much fun hosting this year and I’m so grateful and happy becuase so many people participated. I love seeing people reading and enjoying books by Latinx authors.

For my part, I managed to read 13 books for this readathon and even if I was 3 books short of my goal, I found some amazing books and some incredible authors that I can’t wait to read more books from.

Here are some of my thoughts on the books I read for the Latinx Book Bingo:

Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enriquez (4.5 stars): This book does a good job of commenting on subjects like poverty, addiction, feminicide, police brutality, and so much more, through a gothic lens and with a touch of paranormal elements (a lot of them related to Argentinian folklore). Most of the stories are disturbing and quietly eerie, some with grotesque moments, some transmitting very well the sense of dread and fear of the characters, and a lot of them with spooky and mysterious circumstances. The author leaves the resolution of a lot of the stories up to the reader’s imagination, so it feels like they end quite abruptly, which is a bit jarring but ends up working really well to maintain the sense of uneasiness that the stories create.

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin (4 stars): This was very atmospheric, it was disorienting and trippy because the story is told by a confused, feverish woman, and the book makes the reader feel the frustration of the main character, Amanda, with this very intense and strange little kid who is very pushy and vague with his answers. Beyond that, Samantha Schweblin does a good job of commenting on the use of pesticides in Argentina and its effect on the land, the water, the animals, and the people, but adding a paranormal element that it’s never quite explained but that adds to the weirdness and creepiness of the story. 

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado (4 stars): This was such an unsettling short story collection, it was weird, unique, powerful, and thought-provoking. It was full of interesting concepts, beautiful writing, and stories that had a lot to say about the experiences of women and the bodies that they live in, the things that are done to their bodies, the way their bodies are viewed and perceived, and the meanings that are assigned to their bodies, both by themselves and others.

The Undocumented Americans by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio (4 stars): This is a book about the varied struggles and perseverance of different Latinx undocumented Americans. It’s a book about their experiences, mixed with the author’s own experiences of being undocumented and having undocumented parents, and it’s told in a very casual tone. This book does a great of showing how wildly different the experiences of being an undocumented American are and how the effects of undocumented vary from person to person. The author talks about the undocumented immigrants’ experiences with access to healthcare, work opportunities and conditions, old age and retirement, education and so much more.My only issue with this is that there was something about the writing style that didn’t completely work for me. I think it had to do with the author’s voice.

Her Night with Santa by Adriana Herrera (4 stars): This is smut and it’s great smut. For such a short novella, Adriana Herrera manages to give us compelling characters, an instant connection and tons of chemistry between the characters, and a lot of very steamy scenes. This was a fast, fun and steamy read

One Week to Claim It All by Adriana Herrera (4 stars): This was so fun, dramatic (in telenovela style) and steamy. The main characters had a lot of chemistry and they were easy to root for. My one issue is that the heroine forgot quite easily (before she knew the truth) about what he did to her, which didn’t seem realistic when she has been angry at him for 10 years, but I didn’t mind it too much.

Lupe Wong Won’t Dance by Donna Barba Higuera (3,5 stars): I struggled a lot with the first half of this book because the main character, Lupe, is not necessarily a likeable character. For a big portion of this book, she is selfish, self-centred, and she steamrolls her friends and I had to keep reminding myself that she is a child who is learning about these things. Nonetheless, by the end, I appreciated her character development and I ended up enjoying the second part of the book a lot because it showed her slowly realizing the things that she had done wrong, changing her way of seeing things and working to make up for the way she had behaved. I also appreciated the way this book talked about outdated traditions that are not as inclusive as they could be and should be and how they can be changed without taking away the meaning and significance that they have for people.

Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera (3,5 stars): This novella addresses immigration in a very compelling way by mixing myth and reality, the writing is good and the linguistic choices are interesting. I don’t know if it was because it was so short but something was missing for me.

Sabrina and Corina by Karla Fajardo Anstine (3,5 stars): I have mixed feelings about this collection. These are mostly stories about women suffering and going through hard things -violence, abandonment, inherited trauma, loss, grief – and it does a good job depicting these things but there was no hope here and that made me struggle reading this. Also, these were slice of life stories and I figure out while reading this that I don’t like that in short story collections, most of the time I was left feeling like there was something missing.

Velvet Was the Night by Silvia Moreno-García (4 stars): I ended up enjoying the way things unraveled with the mystery at the heart of this story and I appreciated the setting and context of this, in my opinion, they served as a great backbone to the story. (Full review)

Little Eyes by Samanta Schweblin (3 stars):I had a hard time getting into this book because the stories felt very disjointed and I wasn’t really interested in some of them. Nonetheless, the second half of the book is a lot more interesting, because you know the characters of the different stories, you see what it means to them to be a keeper or a dweller, what relationship they establish with the kentukis and the people on the other side of them, as well as broader implications of this technology. The end was very pessimistic and cynical but it seemed realistic to me and while it wasn’t entirely satisfactory, it was thought-provoking.

Unearthed: A Jessica Cruz Story by Lilliam Rivera and Steph C. (4 stars): I ended up enjoying this, I think it does a great job of discussing the difficulties and fears that undocumented immigrants experience and I think that’s the best part of this graphic novel. The portrait of Jessica’s emotions was very well done and her anger and despair felt very realistic after everything that she went through. My main issue with this is that it includes Mayan gods but that element didn’t really feel integrated into the story and I wish the gods played a bigger role than simply being angel and devil figures whispering in Jessicas ear in a couple of scenes and that’s it.

Eartheater by Dolores Reyes (4.5 stars): This is a powerful book mainly about the violence that women face. It has a compelling main character that felt like a real, complex, fully rounded person, a fascinating concept – a women who can see how people died or where they are and what happened to them by eating earth connected to the person – and writing that, beyond being absolutely beautiful and raw, perfectly transmits the array of feelings that the main character goes through and that the story tries to capture: anger, frustration, fear, grief, passion, indifference, love. I only docked 0.5 stars because the ending wasn’t as satisfactory as I wanted, but overall it was a fantasctic read.

What was the last book written by a Latinx author that you read? What’s your favorite book by a Latinx author?

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50+ book recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo | Latinx Heritage Month 2021

Latinx Book Bingo banner photo

Hi everyone! Today, I’m bringing a super exciting post that it’s a bit late this year. In this post, I’m recommending books for the 2021 Latinx Book Bingo.

The three previous years I have written really long posts with 90 book recommendations, 100 book recommendations , and 170 book recommendations, but a lot of the books were books that I haven’t read yet, so this year I decided to do something a little bit different. I’m recommending 50+ books by Latinx authors that I have read, enjoyed and that I think you should read. I provide recs for each square in the bingo board, I share a short synopsis of the book and I added information like the genre of the books and the kind of rep they have, so you know if it works for more than one prompt in the bingo board. If you need more options or recommendations, you can always check out the lists from previous years.

If you would like to support me or compensate the work I put into running the Latinx Book Bingo each year and making recommendation lists that take a lot of work (it’s not necessary or expected, but if you want to), you could buy me a Ko-fi

Set in Latam

  • Furia by Yamile Saied Méndez:  A YA Contemporary about a girl who is fighting for her dream of being a soccer player despite having to deal with a lot of sexism even from her own family. It has Argentinian rep  and it’s set in Argentina
  • Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo: A YA Contemporary about two sisters that didn’t know theo ther existed until their father dies in a plane crash. Afrolatinx protagonists & author and it’s mostly set in Domican Republic.
  • Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: an adult horror book about a young woman who has to go to a creepy house in the middle of nowhere that it’s inhabited by creepy people who are keeping dark secrets to save her cousin. It has Mexican rep and it’s set in Mexico
  • Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno- Garcia: Adult Fantasy about a young woman who saves the Mayan god of death but ends up tying her fate to his by mistake and has to help him to save herself. It has Mexican rep and it’s set in Mexico.

Name in the Title

Non-fiction

Backlist title

  • Beneath the Citadel by Destiny Sosa: a YA Fantasy about a group of teens trying to pull off a quest that may cost them their lives. it has ace rep, bisexual rep, fat rep and anxiety rep.
  • Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera: A YA Contemporary about a queer Puerto Rican woman who spends a summer in Portland as an intern to a hippy white woman. It has Puerto Rican rep and lesbian rep.
  • Acting on Impulse by Mia Sosa:  Adult Romance about a physical trainer and a Hollywood star falling in love. It has Puerto Rican rep, and Afro-latinx main character and author.
  • Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova: YA Urban Fantasy about a teenage bruja who wants to get rid of her magic and ends up banishing her family to a magical land and has to rescue them. It has Ecuadorian rep, and an f/f romance

Afro-Latinx

  • By Any Means Necessary by Candice Montgomery: a YA contemporary story abouy a young man who is trying to save the bee farm his beloved uncle left him after his death while trying to start a new life at college. It has Brazilian rep, and an Afro-latinx mc & author.
  • The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo: a YA Contemporary about a girl who joind her school’s slam poetry club behind her mother’s back because in a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent. It has Dominican rep and it’s a backlist title.
  • Dactyl Hill Squad by Daniel José Older: a Middle Grade Fantasy about a group of kids living in an alternative reality where there are Dinasours in New York during the Civil War. This has afrolatinx rep and it’s a backlist title.
  • Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson YA Paranormal about a girl who resurrects her best friend and 2 other girls from her school using witchcraft  to prove that they were murdered, but they only have 7 days to do it. it has Mexican rep, fat rep, Afro-Latinx mc & author and it’s a backlist title.

Intersectional MC

  • Miss Meteor by Tehlor Kay Mejia and Anna-Marie McLemore: a YA story about a girl who enters a beauty pageant and asks her ex- best friend for help. To pull off the unlikeliest underdog story in pageant history, they have to imagine a future where girls like them are more than enough. It as fat rep, pansexual rep and trans rep.
  • When Reason Breaks by Cindy L. Rodriguez: a YA Contemporary story abut two girls, who are classmates and who are dealing with depression in very different ways. It has depression rep and it’s a backlist title.
  • Analee, in Real Life by Janelle Milanes YA Contemporary about a girl dealing with the death of her mother and the popular boy who asks her to be his fake girlfriend and coax her out of her comfort zone. It has Cuban rep, social anxiety rep and it’s a backlist title.
  • More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera: a story about a teen who is struggling with family tragedy and with things about himself that he wants to forget, and a memory-alteration procedure that might be the solution. It has gay rep,, Puerto Rican rep, and it’s a backlist title.

Translated book

  • Tender is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica: an adult horror book about an alternative reality where cannibalism is socially accepted and it explores the industry of human meat. It has Argentinian rep and it’s set in Argentina.
  • Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel: a classic about a woman who isn’t allowed to marry because she has to look after her mother until she dies, but she falls in love and her lover marries her sister to stay close to her. It has Mexican rep, it’s set in Mexico and it’s a backlist title.
  • The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende: a classic magical realism book about three generations of the Trueba family, a story that addresses the personal lives of this family and big political events in Chilean history.  It has Chilean rep, it’s set in Chile and it’s a backlist title.
  • City of Clowns by Daniel Alarcon: a graphic novel about a young Peruvian journalist fwho has to confront the idea of his father’s other family after his death while chronicling the life of street clowns in Lima. It has Peruvian rep, it’s set in Peru and it’s a backlist title.

Rec’d by a Latinx Reader (my recommendations!)

  • Lobizona by Romina Garber: A YA Fantasy about a girl who is an undocumented immigrant and she has a distinctive eye color, which ends up connecting her to a secret magical world of lobizones (werewolves) and witches. It has Argentinian Rep.
  • You Had Me at Hola by Alexis Daria: an adult romance about a soap opera star and a Telenovela star, who have to work together in a tv show for the biggest streaming service in the country and end up falling in love. It has Puerto Rican Rep.
  • Land of the Cranes by Aida Salazar a middle grade contemporary about a little girl whose dad gets deported and, later on, her and her pregnant mom are also taken into a deportation facility. it has Mexican rep.
  • Incendiary by Zoraida Cordova: A YA fantasy about a girl who has a magical ability that makes her feared and that has to infiltrate the palace in her kingdom to help a group of rebels that wants to save her people from persecution.

Queer Rep

  • Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas: A YA fantasy about a trans boy and a ghost who are trying to solve a murder mystery and end up falling in love. It has latinx and trans rep and a m/m relationship.
  • When the Moon was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore: A Magical Realism story about two best friends, a trans boy who loves the moon and a Latina who grows roses from her hands, and how they face their struggles while falling in love. It has latinx and trans rep and it’s a backlist title.
  • They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera: A YA Sci-fi story set in a world where people know when they are going to die and two teens decide to spend their last day together. It has gay rep, OCD & anxiety rep, Puerto Rican and Cuban American Rep. It has an intersectional mc and it’s a backlist title.
  • Each of Us a Desert by Mark Oshiro: a YA Fantasy about a girl who has to listen and ,magically absorbe the stories of the people of her town that may produce bad feels because if she doesn’t the stories manifest themselves as monsters. It has a f/f relationship.

Song Title

For this prompt, you can chose a book with a title that has the word “song” in it, or a title that it’s the same as the name of a song or it’s the same as song lyrics.

  • Never Look Back by Lilliam Rivera: A YA retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth, it deals withe mental illness, toxic realtionships and trauma. It has Puerto Rican Rep.
  • Dance All Night by Alexis Daria: romance novella about a broadway start and a dancer who works for a tv dance competion falling in love.
  • We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay MejiaA YA Fantasy about a young woman forced to help a rebelious group to save herself, who learns to stand up for what she believes in. It has a f/f romance.
  • Pride by Ibi Zoboi: A YA retelling of Pride and Prejudice that focuses on gentrification. It has Haitian-Dominican Rep and it’s a backlist title.

Author’s debut

  • Blazewrath Games by Amparo Ortiz: a YA Fantasy about a group of teens who are representing Puerto Rico in the Blazewrath games, which is an international sports tournament where teams of dragons and humans compete. It has Puerto Rican rep.  
  • Ghost Squad by Claribel A. Ortega: A Middle Grade Fantasy about two girls who accidentally awaken malicious spirits and have to team up with a grandma and a cat to save their town. It has Dominican rep.
  • The Dream Weaver by Reina Luz Alegre: a Middle Grade Contemporary about a girl who has to go live with her grandfather and ends up joining a bowling team and trying to save here grandpa’s bowling alley. It has Cuban Rep.
  • American Dreamer by Adriana HerreraAdult Romance about the owner of a food truck and a nerdy librarian who fall in love. It has a Afro-Latinx main character and author, it has gay rep and it’s a backlist title.

Any book by a Latinx author

  • His Perfect Partner by Priscilla Oliveras: this is an adult romance about a single dad and his daughter’s dance teacher. It has Puerto Rican & Mexican Rep and it’s a backlist title.
  • Nocturna by Maya Motayne: A YA Fantasy about a thief and a prince who have to work together to save their kingdom after freeing an ancient evil power. This is Dominican inspired.
  • Category Five by Ann Davila Madrigal:  A YA Horror about about teenagers who get involved with a supernatural mystery involving ghosts. It has Puerto Rican Rep and it’s set in Puerto Rico.
  • With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo: A YA Contemporary about a teen mom fighting for her dream of becoming a chef while falling in love with a cute guy. It has Puerto Rican rep.

Indie Published

  • The Infamous Miss Rodriguez by Lydia San Andres: Adult Historical Romance about a rebellious Afrolatinx heroine and an Argentinian hero. It’s set in the Caribbean, it has a Afrolatinx protagonist and it’s a backlist title.
  • Peluda by Melissa Lozada-Olivia: a poetry collection about the link between femininity, body hair, the immigrant experience and Latina identity. The author is Guatemalan-Colombian.

2021 Release

This is the only category where I’m recommending books that I haven’t read, because the 2021 releases that I have read are either sequels or I didn’t love them enough to recommend them. So what I’m going to do is mention the 2021 releases that are not part of a series and that I can’t wait to read.

I hope this post is useful to everyone participating in the Latinx Book Bingo or to anyone who wants to read more books by Latinx authors!
Are you participating in the Latinx Book Bingo? Have you picked the books for your tbr?
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Latinx Book Bingo Announcement | Latinx Heritage Month 2021

Hi everyone! I’m really excited to share with you all that … the Latinx Book Bingo is officially coming back in 2021! This is the forth round of the readathon and Paola and I are so happy to be hosting it again this year.

THE BINGO 

The Latinx book bingo will take place from September 15 to October 15, which is when we celebrate Latinx Heritage Month. The goal of the readathon is to highlight books written by Latinx authors.

The aim of the bingo is to read as many Latinx books as you can, guided by the prompts on the bingo board.  You can also try to get a bingo (read all prompts on a single line or row — you can read horizontally, vertically, and diagonally), but it’s not necessary, we just hope you read some Latinx reads during this month.

We always want to promote intersectional stories, so while there’s one square that says intersectional MC – which prompts you to read a book where the main character is Latinx AND is part of the LGBTQIA community or has a mental illness or is neurodivergent or disabled- we hope you try to read as many intersectional stories as you can throughout the readathon.  

OTHER INFO

If you want up to date information or recommendations, follow  @LatinxBookBingo  on Twitter or @LatinxBookBingo on Instagram. You can use the #LatinxBookBingo hashtag for all your related tweets and posts and we will retweeting and sharing on our platforms.

I will be posting a tbr and a recommendation list in the next couple of weeks in case you need help setting up your tbr. Also, my twitter and Instagram dms are always open if you need recs!

I hope you can join us! If you have any questions, please let them in the comments! 

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170 Book Recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo | Latinx Heritage Month 2020

Latinx book bingo

Hi everyone! Today I bring you a post that I have put a lot of work into and that I hope you find useful. I’m excited to share recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo 2020, which I’m co-hosting again this year and it’s taking place from September 15th to October 15th!

Before getting into the recs, here are some things you should know:

  • All the books included on this list are written by Latinx authors
  • I haven’t read every book on this list, but I tried to read #ownvoices reviews to make sure the Latinx rep was good. Nonetheless, if you know the rep in one of the books is not good, please let me know!
  • Besides the title and author, I added information like the genre of the books and the kind of rep they have, so you could know if it works for more than one prompt in the bingo board.
  • Click on the title and it will take you to the Goodreads page for the book.
  • The amazon links in this post are affiliate links, so if you use it I may get a small commission, that doesn’t affect the price of your book but it helps me out and it compensates the work I put into this list! 
  • If you are not buying a book, but would like to support me or compensate the work I put into this list (it’s not necessary or expected, but if you want to), you could buy me a Ko-fi
  • If you can’t find a book that interests you and fits one of the categories on this list and need more options, here are the lists I made for the bingo the past two years: 90 Book Recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo + 100 Book Recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo. Maybe you’ll find what you’re looking for there!

With that out of the way, here are the recommendations:

IMG_20200813_205014

Afro-Latinx Main Character 

Note: all these books are by Afro-Latinx authors!

Lighthearted story

Set in/main character from LATAM 

Any book by Latinx Author

Backlist Title

Recommended by Latinx Reader (My recs!)

Note: my recs last year were all YA, so this year I’m recommending Adult and Middle Grade books. If you want some YA recs, you can check out last year’s post. 

Non-Fiction

On Cover Representation

Awards Winning

Note: for this prompt, if a book was shortlisted for an awards it counts 

Group Book

2020 release

Queer rep

Immigrant Story

Intersectional Main Character

Cover with Latinx Flag Colors

Note: These are not all the flags!! But like you can see below there are a lot of flags that share the same colors, so for this post I chose the flags that fit into 3 big groups. You can choose any of the Latinx flags even if they are not included in this post! 

flags 1

flags 2

Flags 3

I hope this post is useful to everyone participating in the Latinx Book Bingo or to anyone who wants to read more books by Latinx authors!
Are you participating in the Latinx Book Bingo? Have you picked the books for your tbr?
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Latinx Book Bingo Announcement | Latinx Heritage Month 2020

Latinx book bingo

Hi everyone! Today I have an exciting announcement to make… the Latinx Book Bingo is officially coming back in 2020! This is the third year in a row that Paola, Allie, and I are hosting this readathon and this year we have some cool things planned for you all.

THE BINGO 

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The Latinx book bingo will take place from September 15 to October 15, which is Hispanic Heritage Month (or how we are choosing to call it: Latinx Heritage Month). The goal of the readathon is to highlight books written by Latinx authors.

The aim of the bingo is to read as many Latinx books as you can, guided by the prompts on the bingo board.  You can also try to get a bingo (read all prompts on a single line or row — you can read horizontally, vertically, and diagonally), but it’s not necessary, we just hope you read some Latinx reads during this month.

We always want to promote intersectional stories, so while there’s one square that says intersectional MC – which prompts you to read a book where the main character is Latinx AND is part of the LGBTQIA community or has a mental illness or is neurodivergent or disabled- we hope you try to read as many intersectional stories as you can throughout the readathon.  

OTHER INFO

Our group book will be announced later this week on Twitter and Instagram. This year like in 2019, we are reading a group book as part of a readalong organized by the hosts of the Latinx Book Club (which I’m part of as well), the Latinxathon, the Con Sabor Reading Challenge and us, the host of the Latinx Book Bingo. We are using #LatinxLitTakeover to keep track of everyone reading with us!

If you want up to date information or recommendations, follow  @LatinxBookBingo  on Twitter or @LatinxBookBingo on Instagram. You can use the #LatinxBookBingo hashtag for all your related tweets and posts and we will retweeting and reposting on our platforms.

I will be posting a tbr and a recommendation list in the next couple of weeks in case you need help setting up your tbr. Also, my twitter and Instagram dms are always open if you need recs!

I hope you can join us! If you have any questions, please let them in the comments! 

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100 Book Recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo| Latinx Heritage Month 2019

Hi everyone! Today I bring you a post I have been working on for a long time and I’m super excited to finally share it with you. In this post, there are recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo 2019, which I’m hosting again this year.  Before getting into the recs, here are some things you should know about them:

  • In each category, the recommendations are organized depending on age group: First, you’ll find YA books, then Middle Grade books and finally Adult books.
  • Click on the title and it will take you to the Goodreads page for the book.
  • I haven’t read every book on this list, but I read #ownvoices reviews for almost every single one of them to make sure the Latinx rep was good. Nonetheless, if you know the rep in one of the books is not good, please let me know!
  • Next to the title and author, there’s a parentheses (), in which I added information like the genre of the books and the kind of rep they have, so you could know if it works for more than one square.
  • If you can’t find a book that intests you and fits one of the categories on this list and need more options, here’s the list I made for the bingo last year: 90 Book Recommendations for the Latinx Book Bingo. Maybe you’ll find what you’re looking for there!

With that out of the way, here are the recommendations:

IMG_20190808_161327

Any book by a Latinx author
Intersectional main character (mc)
Afrolatinx main character
On Cover Representation
Fat Representation 
Backlist Title
Non-Traditional format
Recommended by a Latinx Reader  (My recs for you!)
Non Fiction
Are you participating in the Latinx Book Bingo? Are you reading any of the books on this list? or have you read already any of the books on this list? Let me know!
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